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Short Movie Cue


jamesf
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I wrote a very short piece and thought it might be fun to turn it into a movie cue. I set it to a scene from an old Sherlock Holmes movie...

 

I am on a journey trying to develop my creative side writing some music. The folks here on Logic Pro Help have been very sharing of their time knowledge and it is much appreciated!

 

Have a great day everyone.

 

Edited by jamesf
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Nice work! I think I might have introduced a violin at the point Sherlock is playing his, but these things are a matter of personal choice.
Mac Pro 5,1 • Catalina • LPX 10.6 • M-Audio Axiom 49 • Korg nanoKontrol • Focusrite Saffire Pro26 • Embarrassing amount of plug-ins
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Nice work! I think I might have introduced a violin at the point Sherlock is playing his, but these things are a matter of personal choice.

 

Thanks so much for taking the time to listen and comment! That is a great idea. I could have mixed in some of the original sound from the clip! (or perhaps incorporated a violin part to match the chord structure of the cue) Thanks so much for the feedback.

 

All the best,

James

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It certainly sounds like a cue although it doesn't actually match the movie's timing ... Very nice sounds regardless.

Mike Robinson - "I wanna quit being a computer consultant and become a composer and arranger at age fifty-nevermind."
Logic Pro X, MacBook Pro, 88-key MIDI controller.

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It certainly sounds like a cue although it doesn't actually match the movie's timing ... Very nice sounds regardless.

 

Thank you for taking the time to listen! I'll have to work more on timing my music to the scene...

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  • 2 weeks later...
It certainly sounds like a cue although it doesn't actually match the movie's timing ... Very nice sounds regardless.

 

Thank you for taking the time to listen! I'll have to work more on timing my music to the scene...

 

I don't know if this is of any interest to you, but I worked out a very fast and accurate way of establishing cue points in LPX. Basically, take an audio track (it might be a supplied dialogue file, but it can be pretty much anything)and put a scissor cut at every significant visual edit point. Now colour the various sections, so you can easily see each one as an individual entity.

 

Using this guide, you can very easily adjust the tempo of each section to get an exact fit for your film-score, and to cue the intro point of new instruments etc.

 

If it helps you, you can also expand with idea into a full 'spotting' session, by taking notes on the visual content of each section, the sort of emotional feel, approximate tempo, instrumentation etc. You can do all this in LPX, giving you a self-contained project.

Mac Pro 5,1 • Catalina • LPX 10.6 • M-Audio Axiom 49 • Korg nanoKontrol • Focusrite Saffire Pro26 • Embarrassing amount of plug-ins
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  • 2 weeks later...

 

Thank you for taking the time to listen! I'll have to work more on timing my music to the scene...

 

I don't know if this is of any interest to you, but I worked out a very fast and accurate way of establishing cue points in LPX. Basically, take an audio track (it might be a supplied dialogue file, but it can be pretty much anything)and put a scissor cut at every significant visual edit point. Now colour the various sections, so you can easily see each one as an individual entity.

 

Using this guide, you can very easily adjust the tempo of each section to get an exact fit for your film-score, and to cue the intro point of new instruments etc.

 

If it helps you, you can also expand with idea into a full 'spotting' session, by taking notes on the visual content of each section, the sort of emotional feel, approximate tempo, instrumentation etc. You can do all this in LPX, giving you a self-contained project.

 

Thanks for taking the time to share this excellent pro tip. I hope to get more and more into this as time allows.

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I'm right now in the process of fumbling my way through exactly this process, as I'm trying to create an original score for a set of little videos documenting a cross-country trip that we have recently taken. I found myself (in Final Cut Pro) marking specific sections of the video, and then writing down – just for myself – what I guess is a "spotting session."

 

Then, taking full advantage of the fact that I really have no idea what I am doing, I've been "brainstorming" ideas for musical parts in a dummy Logic project. I have utterly no idea (yet ...) what might eventually come of it. The only brainstorming-rule that I'm now following is: "don't throw anything away."

Mike Robinson - "I wanna quit being a computer consultant and become a composer and arranger at age fifty-nevermind."
Logic Pro X, MacBook Pro, 88-key MIDI controller.

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I have no idea what I'm doing either. I'm living some kind of dream by trying to write music when I have time :-D Your approach sounds solid and I hope you post something here for us to watch when you are finished.
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I'm right now in the process of fumbling my way through exactly this process, as I'm trying to create an original score for a set of little videos documenting a cross-country trip that we have recently taken. I found myself (in Final Cut Pro) marking specific sections of the video, and then writing down – just for myself – what I guess is a "spotting session."

 

Then, taking full advantage of the fact that I really have no idea what I am doing, I've been "brainstorming" ideas for musical parts in a dummy Logic project. I have utterly no idea (yet ...) what might eventually come of it. The only brainstorming-rule that I'm now following is: "don't throw anything away."

 

That seems a valid way to get started. Really, the only way to get better at this stuff is to keep doing it! As with any process, you'll soon find approaches that work for you, and your workflow will get faster.

 

For the benefit of anyone reading this who thinks: "I'd love to have Final Cut Pro, but I can't really afford/justify it", I can 100% recommend the Free version of DaVinci Resolve. Unlike the paid-for version, it only uses one thread of your CPU, but I've had excellent results from it. Not only is it a highly efficient editor, you get great colour correction tools, an entire Fairlight suite, and a very slick rendering section. https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/davinciresolve/

 

The only thing it doesn't handle well is interlaced video, but you can use Handbrake to convert your clips to Progressive. https://handbrake.fr Again, no money need change hands!

Mac Pro 5,1 • Catalina • LPX 10.6 • M-Audio Axiom 49 • Korg nanoKontrol • Focusrite Saffire Pro26 • Embarrassing amount of plug-ins
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On a Mac, you also have iMovie and GarageBand. Both of these are "not-so light, anymore" versions of their proprietary cousins, Final Cut Pro and Logic Pro. You can do a lot of professional-grade work using these tools which come with your Mac. Another great place to get started.

 

And then, if you do start to "get into the business," the purchase price of software (and hardware) that you need to do that business is a "cost of goods sold" that is also subject to very-favorable "Section 179" fast-depreciation under US tax law. Fortunately, Apple's pro products are not expensive, after you've bought the Mac that you require to run them on. (And for that: check out the "refurbished" section at apple.com ... less expensive, same AppleCare.)

Mike Robinson - "I wanna quit being a computer consultant and become a composer and arranger at age fifty-nevermind."
Logic Pro X, MacBook Pro, 88-key MIDI controller.

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On a Mac, you also have iMovie and GarageBand. Both of these are "not-so light, anymore" versions of their proprietary cousins, Final Cut Pro and Logic Pro. You can do a lot of professional-grade work using these tools which come with your Mac. Another great place to get started.

 

And then, if you do start to "get into the business," the purchase price of software (and hardware) that you need to do that business is a "cost of goods sold" that is also subject to very-favorable "Section 179" fast-depreciation under US tax law. Fortunately, Apple's pro products are not expensive, after you've bought the Mac that you require to run them on. (And for that: check out the "refurbished" section at apple.com ... less expensive, same AppleCare.)

 

I wish this forum had a 'Like' button for posts, because these are valuable points you make. We have a similar fast-depreciation system in the UK for hi-tech products. As you say, Apple is not an expensive option if you need it for your work. My Mac Pro dates from mid 2010, and it's still a total workhorse. For accountancy purposes, it would technically have been worth nothing in about 2013.

Mac Pro 5,1 • Catalina • LPX 10.6 • M-Audio Axiom 49 • Korg nanoKontrol • Focusrite Saffire Pro26 • Embarrassing amount of plug-ins
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