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Laptop Upgrade


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Hello Everyone,

 

I am a producer/artist and upgrading laptops. Wanted to know if the mbp Retina 15"(probably get the new one expected to be released this year.) is good enough to handle my workload. 

 

Laptop Spec. (The one I will buy)

Basing on current line;

16gb Ram

i7 3.4 ghz

flash storage debating between 1TB or 500 (depends on my needs and allocation preferences )

 

Workload-

Hardware-

Focusrite 2i2 interface 

keyboard Roland A88

Drums - Roland TKV1

Plugins/VST

Natives-Battery 4, Kontankt 5 with string, woodwinds, brass symphonies, Hammersmith Pro Piano.

 

Effects- Some logic plugins like gain, reverb, and basic EQ. 

 

 

Tracks can run up to 50 at times.

 

I wanted to know if logic pro x can handle my work without error messages or system overload. 

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Well Apple, released the new line today for pre-order. I was thinking of going with 1TB or 2TB SSD.(Debating to go for the 1 and just buy external drive I think with cloud services and external 1TB is not worth 1200). Two questions, is 2.9Ghz worth 200 dollars or is it a minor upgrade that I won't notice. Second is 16gb enough for my production in logic. 
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My cMPB mid 2012 2.6gHz i7 quad core is blazingly fast. I score with 20 plus channels of the most cpu intensive software instruments without a problem. The dual storage option and all of its ports makes it a real winner. I will run it to the ground. The new MBP released today is a rip off and unless the Logic team find a way to innovate using the touch bar then it's just a waste of time.
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"Cores, RAM, and Disk Space," in that order.  Here's why:

 

Cores:  Logic is, by its nature, a very CPU-intensive application.  It will use every scrap of "raw processing power" that you give it.

 

RAM:  Logic uses big things ... sample libraries, etc ... to create and process big things ... waveforms, etc. ... and "it's all happening, as much as possible, in real time."  If a core can't get the memory that it needs to do whatever it's doing, it's stopped cold.

 

Disk Space:  ... while "highly desirable and needed in large quantity," is still "a resource with access-times measured in milli-seconds."  You can always add external storage.  (You can also always swap-out a disk drive.)

 

"Cores" represent raw computing capacity, and "RAM" represents the ability to exploit that capacity to its fullest potential.  Other stuff is secondary to the purposes at bar: you cannot hear "a Retina display."

 

- - - 

 

But also ... Compromise:

 

Even if "you did not Win The Lottery," and therefore you can't afford to buy Your Heart's Desire™ (yet!), you can still get the work done.  It just takes more steps, and Logic is designed to make those steps very painless.  

 

For example, "bounce in place."  A software-track is converted to an equivalent audio-track, and the process doesn't have to occur "in real time."   (Which is: "the difference that makes all the difference.™  Now, your computer doesn't have to 'produce six seconds of audio' in 'less than six seconds, or die trying.'  This off-line activity doesn't have to 'compete' with anything else.)

 

Yes, you are "necessarily working around" the "limits of your hardware," but ... "let's face it, these days, we're spoiled."  :D

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I see the 2012 MacBook Pro mentioned in high regard a lot. I own one and love it. I'm actually searching for a second MacBook Pro and I'm wondering why I shouldn't be looking for a more recent model. I believe the chipset went from Ivy Bridge to Haswell then to Broadwell.  Isn't this an improvement in speed?

Are there any other significant reasons not to look for a later model?

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I see the 2012 MacBook Pro mentioned in high regard a lot. I own one and love it. I'm actually searching for a second MacBook Pro and I'm wondering why I shouldn't be looking for a more recent model. I believe the chipset went from Ivy Bridge to Haswell then to Broadwell.  Isn't this an improvement in speed?

Are there any other significant reasons not to look for a later model?

The quad core processor on the new model is a lot faster, and I'm pretty sure Thunderbolt 2 was introduced on the 2013 models.

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