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separate note velocities in a chord


Thorny
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I write music in the score editor directly. I find when I am writing piano music the velocities of the notes in each chord are set to exactly the same value. I generally tend to like them separated with higher velocities for notes of higher pitch. It is a pain to go through and have to separate each chord! I am really finding that to be true as I am working with a piece that I imported from Finale as a midi file.

 

Two questions: Is it possible to set a default for how the velocities are assign as chords are written. Also, is there a way to explode the velocity pattern for a selected set of chords?

 

Thanks,

 

Thorny

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Thanks, but no luck there. The randomize velocity function does break out the notes in the chord, but the order in the chord is all over the place. It is easier to pull them apart by hand. At least then you know that the top note is always the highest pitch, etc. The rest of the functions aren't of much use here either.
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I can hardly think of a scenario where the highest note of a chord being the loudest one is considered 'normal'. Also, pianists train for years to give each note the same attack, regardless of where on the keyboard, where in the chord or which finger is used. Then, dynamic markings are applied to shape the contour desired by the composer/arranger.

 

So, no, there is no automatic function that works on chords. You could map note pitch to note velocity but that is not restricted to chords and will make for some pretty unexciting music anyway.

 

To easily give a chord the desired dynamic shape, you use a MIDI keyboard and record your playing. Either all in one fell swoop or chord by chord, if need be. This is also by magnitudes faster than point-click-edit-point-click-edit....

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...Also, pianists train for years to give each note the same attack, regardless of where on the keyboard, where in the chord or which finger is used.
Actually the training is to acquire a discrete velocity control over each finger, which is quite different...

In reality, on a real piano, keys perfect equal resistance don't exist. Not to mention that between pianos the difference is more evident. Even for the best adjusted high ends piano keyboards, that inherent unevenness remains. Hence the need to acquire that discrete velocity control over each finger.

 

So, no, there is no automatic function that works on chords. You could map note pitch to note velocity but that is not restricted to chords and will make for some pretty unexciting music anyway.
Not necessarily, depending (among other things) of the mapping it could lead to interesting results...

 

To easily give a chord the desired dynamic shape, you use a MIDI keyboard and record your playing. Either all in one fell swoop or chord by chord, if need be. This is also by magnitudes faster than point-click-edit-point-click-edit....
For a non keyboardist player, as you pointed out previously, that could take years of practice. Therefore "point-click-edit-point-click-edit" would be way faster.
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Thanks, but no luck there. The randomize velocity function does break out the notes in the chord, but the order in the chord is all over the place. It is easier to pull them apart by hand. At least then you know that the top note is always the highest pitch, etc. The rest of the functions aren't of much use here either.
You probably used the Transform Humanize preset. I would encourage you to edit or create your own preset to retain your chord order. Alternately, you could first select all the notes you wish to be louder, then use the transform to increase (adding value) to their velocity.
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I can hardly think of a scenario where the highest note of a chord being the loudest one is considered 'normal'. Also, pianists train for years to give each note the same attack, regardless of where on the keyboard, where in the chord or which finger is used. Then, dynamic markings are applied to shape the contour desired by the composer/arranger.

 

So, no, there is no automatic function that works on chords. You could map note pitch to note velocity but that is not restricted to chords and will make for some pretty unexciting music anyway.

 

To easily give a chord the desired dynamic shape, you use a MIDI keyboard and record your playing. Either all in one fell swoop or chord by chord, if need be. This is also by magnitudes faster than point-click-edit-point-click-edit....

 

Spoken like a true non-keyboardist/pianist. Thanks to Atlas07 for informing.

 

You're probably pretty good on the guitar though. I sure know how to make friends!

 

For the OP:

 

Atlas07's advice about the MIDI Transform is probably your best bet, but it is not well understood or documented (that I know of), and the default 'Create Transform Set' is a little bewildering for first-timers. It is possible to add Velocity scaling to your notes, which can be a multiplication of your note number. So, if all the notes (say C, E and G) are at 80 and you apply the MIDI Transform I show below to your notes, the higher notes (according to the input note and the "Operation on Byte 2" table) will be increased in Velocity.

 

1337380764_Screenshot2020-08-01at15_29_55.thumb.jpg.d9aef57ecbd7c12de0a748d9278a998c.jpg

 

- open MIDI Transform

- click the up/down arrow near the Preset button in the top left, and select "Create New Transform Set"

- click the blue bar to the right (in Data Byte 2 column) until the blue line is drawn from the Data Byte 1 column

- now the MIDI note value will be passed down Data Byte 2 column and processed

- in the Data Byte 2 column select Mult in the lower area

- the Operation table will open

- increase the multiplication value to push your high notes into higher velocity values

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Well, obviously I shouldn't post when in a hurry.

 

Yes, dedicated control of velocity of each finger is what I was ultimately getting at (and being able to play all notes evenly requires that).

 

And yes, I'm a lousy keyboardist, but still I'm 10 times faster entering dynamic chords on a keyboard than with the pencil.

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Thanks for the pointers. If I am feeling ambitious later on I will try the custom transform method. I really appreciate the help.

 

My need for processing lots of chords to separate the velocities is actually limited to a few piano pieces that I would like to bring over from Finale, but I have permanently moved to Logic’s Score Editor so that won’t be a long-time need. Having the ability to have each chord I write have a default that splits the notes out a bit would be useful.

 

I am not a keyboard player and have no interest in becoming one. I find that when I write chords in Logic using my VSL samples, they sound lifeless with all the notes having exactly the same velocity. As I said before, GENERALLY they sound better to me with the higher notes having a higher velocity. I am not trying to create music that is a realistic version of someone else’s playing.

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