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No headroom after bounce for master


tom25
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I'm having an issue where my entire mix has -6db of headroom which is what I want for mastering but when I bounce the mix to a single track then open it in the new session for mastering there is now only -0.3 db of headroom.

 

How do I prevent this from happening?

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Well, a mastering engineer should know how to use a fader so I don't see the problem ?

 

Regardless of whether you see the problem or not, the OP was asking about Logic not bouncing to the level he wants to bounce at.

 

The normalisation setting is the first potential culprit here, so let's hope that solves the OP's problem.

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Ok, I won't go down that rabbit hole... :D

@tom25: des99 gave you a possible cause for your problem, another could be that your master fader (not the fader on stereo out) is set to max (+6). Hth :)

 

there is no rabbit hole. an audio file with a 0db peak is still an audio file with a 0db peak, even if you turn the fader down... just as, for example, a loud guitar solo, played at a low volume, is still a loud guitar solo, just being played back quietly.

 

mastering works with the file itself, not the level you set a fader at...

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Well, I'm not at all a mastering engineer, just an amateur. But, as an example, a mastering engineer who needs to run mixes through his expensive hardware would indeed need to set the appropriate level to have that hardware working optimal. It's his fader I'm thinking of... I'm sure there are many other aspects to this...
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Well, I'm not at all a mastering engineer, just an amateur. But, as an example, a mastering engineer who needs to run mixes through his expensive hardware would indeed need to set the appropriate level to have that hardware working optimal. It's his fader I'm thinking of... I'm sure there are many other aspects to this...

 

am still not getting you. the level of the waveform (the mastered audio file) has nothing to do with where he sets a fader; mastering works with the audiofile. when i master (in ozone9 advanced), the file i import is the file i am mastering; if the level is too high, there's no room to do anything. mastering requires breathing room, with the bounced audio, independent of where you place a fader...

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the level of the waveform (the mastered audio file) has nothing to do with where he sets a fader; mastering works with the audiofile.

 

Sorry to jump in. But if you put the Stereo Out Fader or the Master Fader on a different spot than 0dBFS, the volume is gonna change in the bounce.

It has a lot to do with the fader position.

Maybe you guys are talking about different things?

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.. if the level is too high, there's no room to do anything. mastering requires breathing room, with the bounced audio, independent of where you place a fader...

 

There's room. A mastering engineer can create the headroom he needs to work with by controlling the input gain to his/her mastering chain.

 

As long as a mix is not unintentionally clipped, even when a mix is bounced with peaks very near to 0db, a mastering engineer can set its new level by 'turning down'/gain staging your mix just before his/her mastering chain.

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There's room. A mastering engineer can create the headroom he needs to work with by controlling the input gain to his mastering chain.

 

Exactly. Sometimes I get mixes that have their peaks at 0 dBFS, so I have to bring the fader down on the track before I run it through the hardware.

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.. if the level is too high, there's no room to do anything. mastering requires breathing room, with the bounced audio, independent of where you place a fader...

 

There's room. A mastering engineer can create the headroom he needs to work with by controlling the input gain to his/her mastering chain.

 

As long as a mix is not unintentionally clipped, even when a mix is bounced with peaks very near to 0db, a mastering engineer can set its new level by 'turning down'/gain staging your mix just before his/her mastering chain.

 

i'll accept that that is true, but very different from what i was taught about mastering (this goes back about 6 years); i was taught that the audiofile should always have headroom; different from what's being said here. (anyway, will continue to do my mixes with about a -6db peak). thanks!

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There's room. A mastering engineer can create the headroom he needs to work with by controlling the input gain to his mastering chain.

 

Exactly. Sometimes I get mixes that have their peaks at 0 dBFS, so I have to bring the fader down on the track before I run it through the hardware.

Thanks guys, that's exactly what I had in mind but just couldn't put in writing... :D

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the level of the waveform (the mastered audio file) has nothing to do with where he sets a fader; mastering works with the audiofile. when i master (in ozone9 advanced), the file i import is the file i am mastering; if the level is too high, there's no room to do anything. mastering requires breathing room, with the bounced audio, independent of where you place a fader...

Here's Ozone 9 signal flow: https://s3.amazonaws.com/izotopedownloads/docs/ozone9/en/print/index.html#signal-flow

 

As you can see the first step is "Input gain" so if a client gives you a file that peaks at 0 dBFS and you would rather work with a lower gain, you can reduce the input gain. There's no need for the mix to peak at any specific level.

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the level of the waveform (the mastered audio file) has nothing to do with where he sets a fader; mastering works with the audiofile. when i master (in ozone9 advanced), the file i import is the file i am mastering; if the level is too high, there's no room to do anything. mastering requires breathing room, with the bounced audio, independent of where you place a fader...

Here's Ozone 9 signal flow: https://s3.amazonaws.com/izotopedownloads/docs/ozone9/en/print/index.html#signal-flow

 

As you can see the first step is "Input gain" so if a client gives you a file that peaks at 0 dBFS and you would rather work with a lower gain, you can reduce the input gain. There's no need for the mix to peak at any specific level.

 

no, i get it, really. just comfortable with my workflow... i never touch the gain controls in ozone. but, whatever works, works.

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