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Mastering on LP9 and LPX


ionshunt
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Hello good people,

 

After almost ten years on Logic 9 for recording, mixing and mastering a whole bunch of songs, it was high time I switched to LPX...

 

But, there is a "but".

 

On LP9, if you want to master your mix, you need to launch a new project. LP asks then what kind of project you want ( is it an empty project, a formatted project, a surround project, or a mastering one ) .

 

Yet, apparently, on LPX, it is not the case... Did I miss something ?

 

Because, I've read and watched tutorial, and no one has the same process. ie :

 

Do I need to create a simple project in which I'll import my bounce ( stereo interleaved ? ) and treat it the same way I would treat a mix ?

Or rather import the bounce twice in two different tracks , panned Left and right ? or just none of this at all ?....

 

I'm confused ...

 

Best,

 

ion

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It's really a matter of workflow and personal preference, so in the end, whether using Logic 9 or Logic 10 or any other version or DAW software, the choice is yours between mastering in the original project file or bouncing a stereo file or bouncing stems and mastering in another project file.

 

Some people like to commit their mixing work by bouncing and focusing 100% on mastering in a new empty project, whereas others prefer the flexibility of being able to going back to fine-tuning the mix as they're mastering.

 

I have done both, depending on the project, the time, budget, and my state of mind at the time I was doing the mastering.

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Do I need to create a simple project in which I'll import my bounce ( stereo interleaved ? ) and treat it the same way I would treat a mix ?

 

That is exactly what you do.

Happy Mastering!

 

 

Thanks Triplet,

 

Can I ask you more ? I mean, in LP9, Mastering is preset with 2 tracks, right ? But what about LPX ?

 

Best,

IOn

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It's really a matter of workflow and personal preference, so in the end, whether using Logic 9 or Logic 10 or any other version or DAW software, the choice is yours between mastering in the original project file or bouncing a stereo file or bouncing stems and mastering in another project file.

 

Some people like to commit their mixing work by bouncing and focusing 100% on mastering in a new empty project, whereas others prefer the flexibility of being able to going back to fine-tuning the mix as they're mastering.

 

I have done both, depending on the project, the time, budget, and my state of mind at the time I was doing the mastering.

 

 

Thank You David,

 

So if I do this , I won't be wrong all the way :

 

1. Mix and bounce in stereo interleaved

2. Create new project ( empty)

3. Import the stereo track ( AIFF I suppose )

4. Play, hoops, no, work around

5. Have a beer at the end only

 

Best,

IOn

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I mean, in LP9, Mastering is preset with 2 tracks, right ? But what about LPX ?

 

Open a new project.

Create one or how many audio tracks you need and then import the mix files thru the All Files Browser on the right.

Also remember to do a Save As... and include Audio Files before you import stuff. That way the project is self-contained.

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Can I ask you more ? I mean, in LP9, Mastering is preset with 2 tracks, right ? But what about LPX ?

Logic 10 does not have a mastering template but you could make your own, or use the Logic 9 template in Logic 10. I recommend, however, not working from a template. Start a new empty project every time to keep your slate blank and your options open, make decisions based on what you're hearing and what you feel the current project needs, and not be enticed to resort to reflex actions induced by a typical chain of plug-in, where you may start compressing just because "that's what you start with" without having first listened to your mix to determine whether it actually needs compressing or not.

 

The exception to this rule is if you're going to master several files that belong to the same collection like chapters for an audiobook or songs that belong to the same album, in which case the different master may need the same or similar treatment.

 

Thank You David,

 

So if I do this , I won't be wrong all the way :

 

1. Mix and bounce in stereo interleaved

2. Create new project ( empty)

3. Import the stereo track ( AIFF I suppose )

4. Play, hoops, no, work around

5. Have a beer at the end only

 

Best,

IOn

Yes, definitely. But keep an open mind, don't get stuck on recipes that may not always work, make sure you can adapt to what the situation needs and the tools you have at hand. For example in #5, if all you have around you are 25cl beers, you may determine that it's TWO beers you need at the end of the day. :lol:

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I mean, in LP9, Mastering is preset with 2 tracks, right ? But what about LPX ?

 

Open a new project.

Create one or how many audio tracks you need and then import the mix files thru the All Files Browser on the right.

Also remember to do a Save As... and include Audio Files before you import stuff. That way the project is self-contained.

Cheers Triplets,

 

You saved my day, and my summer.

 

Best,

IOn

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Can I ask you more ? I mean, in LP9, Mastering is preset with 2 tracks, right ? But what about LPX ?

Logic 10 does not have a mastering template but you could make your own, or use the Logic 9 template in Logic 10. I recommend, however, not working from a template. Start a new empty project every time to keep your slate blank and your options open, make decisions based on what you're hearing and what you feel the current project needs, and not be enticed to resort to reflex actions induced by a typical chain of plug-in, where you may start compressing just because "that's what you start with" without having first listened to your mix to determine whether it actually needs compressing or not.

 

The exception to this rule is if you're going to master several files that belong to the same collection like chapters for an audiobook or songs that belong to the same album, in which case the different master may need the same or similar treatment.

 

Thank You David,

 

So if I do this , I won't be wrong all the way :

 

1. Mix and bounce in stereo interleaved

2. Create new project ( empty)

3. Import the stereo track ( AIFF I suppose )

4. Play, hoops, no, work around

5. Have a beer at the end only

 

Best,

IOn

Yes, definitely. But keep an open mind, don't get stuck on recipes that may not always work, make sure you can adapt to what the situation needs and the tools you have at hand. For example in #5, if all you have around you are 25cl beers, you may determine that it's TWO beers you need at the end of the day. :lol:

 

Cheers David,

 

Thats' right : nothing like freedom.

 

Have a nice day ( back to work for now... )

IOn

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