Jump to content

MIDI Chord Progressions


Recommended Posts

MacBook Pro 10.8.5 2.2 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo 6GB Ram - Logic Pro X (10.2) - MacMini 10.13.6 2GHz Intel Core i7 16GB Ram - GarageBand 10.4.5 Logic Pro X (10.4.8) - iPad Mini iOS 12 - iOS GarageBand 2.0.1 - Qosimo X70-A 10.13.6 Intel® Core™ i7-4700MQ Processor 32GB DDR3L 1600MHz memory, 2-500GB 7200rpm hard drives - Logic Pro X (10.4.8) - MacMini M1 11.6.1 Apple M1 16GB Ram 1TB SSD Logic Pro X (10.7.1) Rosetta 2 not installed

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Thanks for sharing." This page is particularly interesting to me because it lists types of progressions ... "backdoor?" ... "Montgomery-Ward(!) bridge?" ... "Sears-Roebuck bridge?" ... that I had not previously been aware of.

 

"Yeah, that page just earned a permanent bookmark."

Mike Robinson - "I wanna quit being a computer consultant and become a composer and arranger at age fifty-nevermind."
Logic Pro X, MacBook Pro, 88-key MIDI controller.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Thanks for sharing." This page is particularly interesting to me because it lists types of progressions ... "backdoor?" ... "Montgomery-Ward(!) bridge?" ... "Sears-Roebuck bridge?" ... that I had not previously been aware of.

 

"Yeah, that page just earned a permanent bookmark."

Yes and what I really like about that is they posted not just the audio, but the MIDI. :mrgreen:

MacBook Pro 10.8.5 2.2 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo 6GB Ram - Logic Pro X (10.2) - MacMini 10.13.6 2GHz Intel Core i7 16GB Ram - GarageBand 10.4.5 Logic Pro X (10.4.8) - iPad Mini iOS 12 - iOS GarageBand 2.0.1 - Qosimo X70-A 10.13.6 Intel® Core™ i7-4700MQ Processor 32GB DDR3L 1600MHz memory, 2-500GB 7200rpm hard drives - Logic Pro X (10.4.8) - MacMini M1 11.6.1 Apple M1 16GB Ram 1TB SSD Logic Pro X (10.7.1) Rosetta 2 not installed

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...

MacBook Pro 10.8.5 2.2 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo 6GB Ram - Logic Pro X (10.2) - MacMini 10.13.6 2GHz Intel Core i7 16GB Ram - GarageBand 10.4.5 Logic Pro X (10.4.8) - iPad Mini iOS 12 - iOS GarageBand 2.0.1 - Qosimo X70-A 10.13.6 Intel® Core™ i7-4700MQ Processor 32GB DDR3L 1600MHz memory, 2-500GB 7200rpm hard drives - Logic Pro X (10.4.8) - MacMini M1 11.6.1 Apple M1 16GB Ram 1TB SSD Logic Pro X (10.7.1) Rosetta 2 not installed

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very similar to the "Nashville Number System."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nashville_Number_System

 

Pragmatic professional musicians, such as https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wrecking_Crew_(music), who were entirely accustomed to playing in whatever key the client wanted, used "seven numbers" to describe the notes and the chords within the key.

Mike Robinson - "I wanna quit being a computer consultant and become a composer and arranger at age fifty-nevermind."
Logic Pro X, MacBook Pro, 88-key MIDI controller.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very similar to the "Nashville Number System."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nashville_Number_System

 

Pragmatic professional musicians, such as https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wrecking_Crew_(music), who were entirely accustomed to playing in whatever key the client wanted, used "seven numbers" to describe the notes and the chords within the key.

Cool, thanks for those links.

MacBook Pro 10.8.5 2.2 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo 6GB Ram - Logic Pro X (10.2) - MacMini 10.13.6 2GHz Intel Core i7 16GB Ram - GarageBand 10.4.5 Logic Pro X (10.4.8) - iPad Mini iOS 12 - iOS GarageBand 2.0.1 - Qosimo X70-A 10.13.6 Intel® Core™ i7-4700MQ Processor 32GB DDR3L 1600MHz memory, 2-500GB 7200rpm hard drives - Logic Pro X (10.4.8) - MacMini M1 11.6.1 Apple M1 16GB Ram 1TB SSD Logic Pro X (10.7.1) Rosetta 2 not installed

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The reason I posted that link was because of what I've been working on.

Create a song using the Roman Numerial system but to be able to use any scale/key at any place in the song, not just a verse/chorus kind of thing and of course, use Apple Loops as my session players.

MacBook Pro 10.8.5 2.2 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo 6GB Ram - Logic Pro X (10.2) - MacMini 10.13.6 2GHz Intel Core i7 16GB Ram - GarageBand 10.4.5 Logic Pro X (10.4.8) - iPad Mini iOS 12 - iOS GarageBand 2.0.1 - Qosimo X70-A 10.13.6 Intel® Core™ i7-4700MQ Processor 32GB DDR3L 1600MHz memory, 2-500GB 7200rpm hard drives - Logic Pro X (10.4.8) - MacMini M1 11.6.1 Apple M1 16GB Ram 1TB SSD Logic Pro X (10.7.1) Rosetta 2 not installed

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another demo of using Roman Numerial chord progressions and to be able to change the chord formula, scale and key on the fly to experiment to chord progressions.

MacBook Pro 10.8.5 2.2 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo 6GB Ram - Logic Pro X (10.2) - MacMini 10.13.6 2GHz Intel Core i7 16GB Ram - GarageBand 10.4.5 Logic Pro X (10.4.8) - iPad Mini iOS 12 - iOS GarageBand 2.0.1 - Qosimo X70-A 10.13.6 Intel® Core™ i7-4700MQ Processor 32GB DDR3L 1600MHz memory, 2-500GB 7200rpm hard drives - Logic Pro X (10.4.8) - MacMini M1 11.6.1 Apple M1 16GB Ram 1TB SSD Logic Pro X (10.7.1) Rosetta 2 not installed

Link to comment
Share on other sites

VPS Avenger is Native M1 too.

MacBook Pro 10.8.5 2.2 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo 6GB Ram - Logic Pro X (10.2) - MacMini 10.13.6 2GHz Intel Core i7 16GB Ram - GarageBand 10.4.5 Logic Pro X (10.4.8) - iPad Mini iOS 12 - iOS GarageBand 2.0.1 - Qosimo X70-A 10.13.6 Intel® Core™ i7-4700MQ Processor 32GB DDR3L 1600MHz memory, 2-500GB 7200rpm hard drives - Logic Pro X (10.4.8) - MacMini M1 11.6.1 Apple M1 16GB Ram 1TB SSD Logic Pro X (10.7.1) Rosetta 2 not installed

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A digital computer chord-making tool can be very handy because the computer, being a computer, will always produce the correct chord variation the very first and every time. But I think that you should still also spend the time to understand the fairly-simple basics of "how the trick is done."

 

One of the "classic" way that music students used to be taught this was to have them learn how to read music and then to study "classic" scores. There were various "classic" composers who pioneered many of the things that we use today, and if you can read music you can see how they did it even without playing it.

 

Today of course you can go one step farther – downloading digital copies of those scores which are now in the public domain into your favorite music-scoring tool (mine is the absolutely-free "MuseScore"), and have it play them – perfectly, of course – while you watch. (The "MuseScore" web site references a very large project which is dedicated to doing exactly that, for educational purposes.) Logic also recognizes these industry-standard digital file formats. A few modern bands have even licensed their own music for this educational purpose: you can tear it apart but can't sell it.

Mike Robinson - "I wanna quit being a computer consultant and become a composer and arranger at age fifty-nevermind."
Logic Pro X, MacBook Pro, 88-key MIDI controller.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...