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Why does converting audio to midi change note velocities randomly and also quantize rhythm


Stevie Boi
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Hey all,

 

I've just worked out how to convert audio to midi by turning on flex pitch etc...

One thing I noticed is that some notes are now much louder. This velocity change doesn't reflect the audio volumes (I know this because each note of the bass line I converted was a sample. Sometimes the same note/sample comes out as a higher velocity).

Another thing I noticed, is that it automatically quantizes the rhythm. I definitely want to keep the rhythm that I had in the audio as I don't want anything to be on the grid. (Certain notes are in between straight 16ths and 8th note triplets).

I can, of course, drag each velocity and each note rhythm back in time, but that will be tedious. I'm hoping to use this method of converting audio to midi quite a bit so I'd like to start learning the tips and tricks to keep a good work flow. 

Anyone got a solution to these two things?

 

Many thanks in advance and have a great day!

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Velocities of notes could be adjusted in different ways. Region's velocity, dynamics or track velocity related parameters; use the Piano Roll's automation velocity Grabbing several points to adjust them up or down (or using the velocity tool to draw a level line;

image.thumb.png.8db5cbd01c6ade3195f4a6b16ec9c936.png

use a transform function; etc...

To keep the original quantization you could try the Groove track (keeping the original audio recording as the reference). You probably will probably need to flex time it and might also want to mute same to keep only the MIDI version.

 

As mentioned in the documentation, audio to MIDI conversion is working better on monophonic sound without fx.

Edited by Atlas007
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1 hour ago, polanoid said:

Also, what exactly do you mean by "etc..."? There certainly are various ways to convert audio to MIDI.

 

Good question. I should have made that clear.

To convert audio to midi I double click the audio which then brings up a window at the bottom of the screen showing the waves close up.

From here I click the 'Show/Hide Flex' button so that it turns blue. The dropdown menu next to that button is automatically set to 'Flex Time - Slicing'. I change this to 'Flex Pitch' then I select 'Create Midi Track From Flex Pitch Data' from the edit menu.

The Time Quantize is set to 'off' as a default.

The interesting thing with the velocities being different is that the exact same note 'E' is being repeated 3 times in a row. The third time, the 'E' plays much louder than the 2 notes before. In the original audio it's exactly the same volume.

I’ve also noticed that the not lengths are all too long compared to the audio. I guess it reads the decay of each note as the length of the note. Does that sound right? Either way, it sounds nothing like the original bass line due to all of those changes.

 

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1 hour ago, Atlas007 said:

Velocities of notes could be adjusted in different ways. Region's velocity, dynamics or track velocity related parameters; use the Piano Roll's automation velocity Grabbing several points to adjust them up or down (or using the velocity tool to draw a level line;

image.thumb.png.8db5cbd01c6ade3195f4a6b16ec9c936.png

use a transform function; etc...

To keep the original quantization you could try the Groove track (keeping the original audio recording as the reference). You probably will probably need to flex time it and might also want to mute same to keep only the MIDI version.

As mentioned in the documentation, audio to MIDI conversion is working better on monophonic sound without fx.

Groove track sounds like it could be the way to go. I'll give it a shot.

Thanks!

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With many things in life, our frustrations are coming from very high expectations. Same with audio to midi. Technology is not perfect. It just helps. Still nothing beats plugging in a guitar or microphone and performing ourselves and recording  it. 
(also recording midi performance and editing later in the piano roll) 

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4 hours ago, Mania said:

With many things in life, our frustrations are coming from very high expectations. Same with audio to midi. Technology is not perfect. It just helps. Still nothing beats plugging in a guitar or microphone and performing ourselves and recording  it. 
(also recording midi performance and editing later in the piano roll) 

Melodyne does a way better work in almost all cases. However, its price is equivalent to Logic Pro…

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