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Got my Bluebird..How Can I Make It Sing?


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So about a month ago I ordered and received my Blue Bluebird mic and am throroughly impressed with the quality of it. I've done a couple of easy voiceover sessions with it and have done some experimenting with a female vocalist on it as well. Here's my question: as someone who's used to working mostly in the box and going to a studio to record vocals when necessary, what's the best way to get a mic to really sing?

 

At the moment I've forgone an additional mic pre because I was told to get the mic and tune the room before jumping in and buying a separate pre, so that's what I've done. Currently just using the somewhat decent built-in pres in my MOTU unit.

 

So, what kind of settings should I be using? What kind of visual feedback in Logic should I be looking for? The MOTU has a 0, 18, and 36db pad switch on it and then an additional 24db of trim available. What's the sweet spot here? How do I find it?

 

Just some curious questions as someone who's coming out of the box a bit and trying to get more hands on with all the aspects of what I'm working with.

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Hi there... I hope you're not going to take this bad, but you probably won't get a useful answer here. What you are asking for is an "instant recipe" for recording audio.

 

"Instant Pop"... maybe the problem is just here. In pro audio, the only "instant anything" you'll find will probably be coffee. And even there, you'll wish it wasn't.

 

I really don't mean to sound pedantic, but getting the best out of a mic is a job. Not one impossible to master, not one reserved to a very exclusive elite, but just a job (or actually, one small part of a job). Nobody can teach you that in one forum post. There is sooo many parameters, beginning with simply knowing what you want, and going up to what are the specifics of acoustics on planet earth through how to get the best out of a performer (before getting the best out of a piece of gear). Let alone what a 24db trim is made for.

 

Now cheer up, because if you're not going to learn that in a forum reply, you'll learn it anyway. It'll take you many months, most probably a few years, a ton of trial and error, but you'll get it. Just read! All of this info is available on the net, through forums but also databases, manufacturer's website, and onlin magazines. If you are extra careful in the way you sort, compare and try all the info you find, you can learn it all.

 

Once again, I'm sorry because I realize how much this reply sounds like a lecture. That's not my intent, and I imagine you gotta be disappointed.

 

Well, just so it won't be said I just quacked and moralized, here's a few adresses to start with (and no, I work for none of them. I just used the and still do sometimes):

 

A brillant collection of articles from a ton of different sources:

http://theprojectstudiohandbook.com/directory.htm

 

Two good pro sisteer magazines (type "recording vocals") in their search engins):

http://mixonline.com/

http://emusician.com/

 

A great book, very complete (expensive but worth every penny):

http://www.mixingwithyourmind.com/preview_intro.htm

 

And finally, the holy scritpures by Saint Bob Katz (excellent but definitely more "advanced" level):

http://www.digido.com/articles/index.php

 

Hope this helps. Best of luck,

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Hi there... I hope you're not going to take this bad, but you probably won't get a useful answer here. What you are asking for is an "instant recipe" for recording audio.

 

"Instant Pop"... maybe the problem is just here. In pro audio, the only "instant anything" you'll find will probably be coffee. And even there, you'll wish it wasn't.

 

I really don't mean to sound pedantic, but getting the best out of a mic is a job. Not one impossible to master, not one reserved to a very exclusive elite, but just a job (or actually, one small part of a job). Nobody can teach you that in one forum post. There is sooo many parameters, beginning with simply knowing what you want, and going up to what are the specifics of acoustics on planet earth through how to get the best out of a performer (before getting the best out of a piece of gear). Let alone what a 24db trim is made for.

 

Now cheer up, because if you're not going to learn that in a forum reply, you'll learn it anyway. It'll take you many months, most probably a few years, a ton of trial and error, but you'll get it. Just read! All of this info is available on the net, through forums but also databases, manufacturer's website, and onlin magazines. If you are extra careful in the way you sort, compare and try all the info you find, you can learn it all.

 

Once again, I'm sorry because I realize how much this reply sounds like a lecture. That's not my intent, and I imagine you gotta be disappointed.

 

Well, just so it won't be said I just quacked and moralized, here's a few adresses to start with (and no, I work for none of them. I just used the and still do sometimes):

 

A brillant collection of articles from a ton of different sources:

http://theprojectstudiohandbook.com/directory.htm

 

Two good pro sisteer magazines (type "recording vocals") in their search engins):

http://mixonline.com/

http://emusician.com/

 

A great book, very complete (expensive but worth every penny):

http://www.mixingwithyourmind.com/preview_intro.htm

 

And finally, the holy scritpures by Saint Bob Katz (excellent but definitely more "advanced" level):

http://www.digido.com/articles/index.php

 

Hope this helps. Best of luck,

 

Apart from the lecture on what my screenname is and how you think it applies to the way I work with music, thanks for the reply. I've been doing this a long time (on the other side of the console) and I know it isn't an "instant" thing. What I was looking for was tips. What others have done. What their experiences have been. That's what we do here - we share experiences.

 

Thank you for the links. I visit most of these sites frequently and will certainly search the appropriate terms there, but wanted to get other user experience as well from the people I respect here on the forum. The one thing I had forgotten about was the Mix With Your Mind book.

 

This isn't meant as an attack on you, but why is it that you sometimes get users in forums like this that feel they have to treat the industry and practice as some sort of black magic? "Seek and ye shall find..." Don't get me wrong, taxi, I appreciate the response, but the 2 paragraph lecture of what I can and can't learn in a forum post wasn't really necessary. Regardless of how many times you say you don't want it to be/isn't a lecture, it still was. I wasn't asking for an "instant recipe" for anything - simply tips, tricks and advice anyone had. I'll be respectful and not try to dissect your username to assess what type of person you might be.

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