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there wil be blood


aleos
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I'm a big fan of this film, and the soundtrack especially.

 

Anyone have some ideas on how to reproduce the wonderful (de)tuning of the orchestra. Great work by Johnny Greenwood from radiohead in this film, incase anyone didn't know.

 

 

I'm trying hard to compose modern stuff for strings in logic with Kontakt and vsl, but there's just so much that it gets overwhelming. I'm finally getting the hang of the score editor after years of avoiding it, but articulations....jesus...

Anyone ever write a "how to" setupguide for the digital orchestrater? that's what I need.

 

help/thanks

 

Aleos

2021 M1 MBP

MacOS 12.01

Logic Pro 10.6.1

Apogee Ensemble

Komplete Ultimate, Machine, Komplete Kontrol

Various Spitfire libraries

http://www.alexformosa.com

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Anyone ever write a "how to" setupguide for the digital orchestrater? that's what I need.

 

Maybe if we ask real nice, ( you know, please, thank you and credit card), then maybe Jay Asher will write one.

I'd buy one.

 

Sorry I currently don't know of one.

The legend of the people who accidentally wrote really really good songs about me.......

-----------------------------------------

At Play in the Tale of Now.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi

 

You might like

 

The Guide To Midi Orchestration by Paul Gilreath

 

It's very informative. I myself need to go over it again. :D

 

Have a good one

MBP 4gb ram, Mac OS 10.5.8. Logic Pro 9.1, Apogee Duet, Pod XT Pro

 

"By the light of the night it'll all seem alright. I'll get you a satanic mechanic."

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I saw the movie yesterday and the soundtrack is great, but I don't hear the orchestra detuned. There are what I think are some string glissandos in a couple places the swirl up. Kind of like parts in the soundtrack to 2001.

Steve Barnette

Dojo of Cool

-----------------------------------------

 

OS X 10.5.6

Mac Pro 8-core

Logic Pro 8.02 RME FF800

Pro Tools 7.4.2 Digi 003R

Oxygen 61

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I use sibelious to write all my orchestra parts and then transfer the midi file into Logic because i can't stand the score editor that logic comes with.

Engineer's Need Lots of Tail

 

Mac Pro 2.8Ghz 8-core. 8 GB RAM, Storm Drum1 and 2, East West Orchestra, Voices of Passion, Pianos Gold, EW Choirs, MachFive2, Motu 8pre, Event TR6's, OSX 10.7.x, LP9.(most recent)

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I would also recommend getting the The Guide To Midi Orchestration by Paul Gilreath.

 

I played on the sessions for "There will be Blood" and also on the BBC Radio Broadcast of Superhet Receiver, which is the work that the music is based on. It was a result of Jonny Greenwood being the composer in residence for the BBC Concert Orchestra and some workshops we did with Jonny developing some of those sounds.

 

I also use VSL and can tell you that you cannot reproduce the effect at the beginning of the film unless they record some very specific samples, and even then it would be difficult.

 

The effect is for every individual to choose a different note from some indicated note clusters and then slide in pretty much free time to the unison note with different sections going in different directions (some up and some down). Even if you had the correct glissando samples you would have to set up 34 different instances (10 1st violins, 8 2nds, 6 Violas, 6 Cellos and 4 Basses. The other interesting thing about the sound was that we all had to try and make the sound "break up" by pressing too hard on the string (can you really see VSL doing these samples!). This produced the particular sound that you hear and it took a lot of work between Jonny's idea and the players working out how to achieve it to produce what you hear in the film. Hope you find this interesting and how about using some glissando samples and having a go.

 

best wishes

 

Richard

Logic Pro X 10.2.4 iMac (27-inch, Mid 2011,) 3.4 GHz Intel Core i7, 16 gb ram 2gb AMD graphics, Lacie 3tb hard drive, Focusrite Scarlett 2i4, midiman 2x2, Nectar P1 Vienna SE. Pianoteq V5.
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  • 4 months later...
but I don't hear the orchestra detuned.

 

Yeah, I know, I just meant the major gliss. It just sounds like tuning, because it's "out", then it's "in". :)

 

 

thanks basswatson, really cool to hear about it. I love the soundtrack, you guys did great. Composer and players.

2021 M1 MBP

MacOS 12.01

Logic Pro 10.6.1

Apogee Ensemble

Komplete Ultimate, Machine, Komplete Kontrol

Various Spitfire libraries

http://www.alexformosa.com

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  • 3 months later...
  • 2 months later...
  • 12 years later...
I would also recommend getting the The Guide To Midi Orchestration by Paul Gilreath.

 

I played on the sessions for "There will be Blood" and also on the BBC Radio Broadcast of Superhet Receiver, which is the work that the music is based on. It was a result of Jonny Greenwood being the composer in residence for the BBC Concert Orchestra and some workshops we did with Jonny developing some of those sounds.

 

I also use VSL and can tell you that you cannot reproduce the effect at the beginning of the film unless they record some very specific samples, and even then it would be difficult.

 

The effect is for every individual to choose a different note from some indicated note clusters and then slide in pretty much free time to the unison note with different sections going in different directions (some up and some down). Even if you had the correct glissando samples you would have to set up 34 different instances (10 1st violins, 8 2nds, 6 Violas, 6 Cellos and 4 Basses. The other interesting thing about the sound was that we all had to try and make the sound "break up" by pressing too hard on the string (can you really see VSL doing these samples!). This produced the particular sound that you hear and it took a lot of work between Jonny's idea and the players working out how to achieve it to produce what you hear in the film. Hope you find this interesting and how about using some glissando samples and having a go.

 

best wishes

 

Richard

I know it's been 13 years since you wrote this comment but as a massive fan of Jonny Greenwood's creative output, I've always been interested in the writing process of his marvelous scores. I'd like to ask that does he use MIDI orchestration or any kind of notation software or is he a pencil and paper composer? If I can learn more about this, it would make my day, week, and month! Thank you so much in advance! And kudos to your great effort in this unforgettable and groundbreaking score which is my favorite film score of all-time!

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