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Remixing and Producing with mastering in mind...


trypsin4ever

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Hi all,

 

I've been remixing as a hobby for about 7 years, and recently had some official releases on labels. However, I've always had a problem with my mixes sounding "muddy", "hollow", or "narrow" and quite frankly lacking dynamics. Mixes will hit right at zero, and frequencies are so bunched up that they don't peak naturally, and compression takes over. I end up having to go through every track in Logic, adding a Gain to the end of my chain and bringing everything down 6 - 10db. I'm also still trying to learn how to place certain house/electronic elements across the stereo spread.

 

So my question is, what should I be doing as a remixer to ensure my mixes are the best they can be before they go to a mastering engineer? I'm still a bit new to compressors and limiters, but very eager to learn more. I'm very detail and task-oriented, so please be as specific as possible if you share some best practices. ;-)

 

I really appreciate the help!

 

tryp

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OMG you need to take a look at a Mac Pro Video called "Mixing Electronica by Olav Basoski". Just stayed up all night taking notes. My notes will be my bible to do exactly what you are talking about. Lots on Compression technique and getting it to that punchy professional level. My mixes are about to take a quantum leap forward!
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OMG you need to take a look at a Mac Pro Video called "Mixing Electronica by Olav Basoski". Just stayed up all night taking notes. My notes will be my bible to do exactly what you are talking about. Lots on Compression technique and getting it to that punchy professional level. My mixes are about to take a quantum leap forward!

 

 

same exact thing i was gonna type that video changed my life, and if u wanna learn about spreading watch the mixing r&b video he goes into hight with and depth in music mixing those 2 will change you completely and not look back

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I've always had a problem with my mixes sounding "muddy", "hollow", or "narrow" and quite frankly lacking dynamics.

 

Not to diminish your desire to learn, but if "labels" are releasing and presumably selling your stuff I would say you're good to go. Meaning if by your own admission you're not too keen on compression and limiting and your mixes generally lack what you describe yet they're still good enough for more than one label I would say repeat what you did on the mixes they liked on your projects going forward. In many respects, if your mixes are good enough for labels to buy it's all gravy as far as mastering goes is it not? In that I would suspect whomever is releasing your music is mastering it as well, yes? Or are they all leaving that up to you?

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Yes, those labels were smaller, indy labels that really expected me to do the mastering and give them the final product. Granted I still have an ear to develop for something that's mastered and something that's not, but my mixes on iTunes sound pretty much the same. But I do understand if some A&R or label likes it at is...I'm ready for my check. ;-)
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