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newbie confused by article about aux and bus


spaz

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so i am trying to do my share of stuying logic and got this article

http://www.omega-art.com/logic/faq/html/faq15.htm#02

 

well, this article talks about virtual nodes, aux objects, etc. now i am even more confused than before.

 

so my question is probably laughable but here it is: what is the differences between aux(es) and bus(es) ? what do you use one for and the other for ?

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I'm not sure how well I'll answer your question, but since I'm still fairly a novice, my answer may be dumbed down enough to make sense:

 

From what I understand, a bus is what transmits the sound of a channel strip to an aux-send. Much like how in computer architecture, a bus transmits data, working like a subsystem. Basically, you are then able to adjust the level of the signal being sent from the corresponding channel into the signal bus, which is routed into the corresponding aux-send output.

 

Does that make sense?

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I'm not sure how well I'll answer your question, but since I'm still fairly a novice, my answer may be dumbed down enough to make sense:

 

From what I understand, a bus is what transmits the sound of a channel strip to an aux-send. Much like how in computer architecture, a bus transmits data, working like a subsystem. Basically, you are then able to adjust the level of the signal being sent from the corresponding channel into the signal bus, which is routed into the corresponding aux-send output.

 

Does that make sense?

 

thanks, but from that article i mentioned i "perceive" that both aux and bus can/could do the same thing, however i dont see their separate differences or use...

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thanks, but from that article i mentioned i "perceive" that both aux and bus can/could do the same thing, however i dont see their separate differences or use...

 

Well, the article does explain some differences, like in this passage on Aux objects:

 

15.4 What is an Aux object?

 

An Aux object is somewhat like a Bus object "on steroids". Or: it's a mix of a Bus object and an Input object, but then slightly different:

 

* Inputs:

o A Bus object has no Input popup; instead it gets its input from the (virtual) bus as determined by its Cha parameter.

o An Input object also doesn't have an Input popup: it gets its input from the (soundcard) input that's picked as its Cha parameter

o Aux object does have an Input popup, and can get its input from either a bus (like a Bus object), or an Input (like an Input object).

* Sends:

o A Bus object has no Sends

o Input and Aux objects do have Sends

* Inserts/Outputs

o As far as Inserts and Outputs are concerned, Input, Bus and Aux objects are the same.

 

However, I can also see that they're using an older version of Logic for this FAQ. Not sure how many things have changed since L8 was introduced. But I think the main thing is that Bus and Aux affect each other, but can also be used separately. They're both receiving and transmitting sound.

 

As far as the technicalities go-- I'm sure one of the pros will jump into this thread any second and drop some massive wisdom on our feeble minds! :lol:

 

(And right above me, the wisdom has been broughten!)

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in its simplest form, a bus is the connection between your tracks and your

auxes.

 

a good analogy would be a patch chord, like between your guitar and amplifier.

you can't plug the guitar physically into the amp, so you use a chord to

to transfer the sound signal to the amp.

 

in logic you can't go from a track channel strip straight to an aux.

so you use a bus as the connection between them.

 

most threads you will read about this are confusing because they are

mostly based on logic 7, where environment and bus routing was

confusing til you finally got your head around it.

 

but in logic 8, you don't even have to worry about it because its all done automatically. you send a track to a bus and logic automatically creates an

aux for you.

 

now these busses have many more complex uses, but unless you really

got some super complex routing necessity ,then don't even woorry about it.

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