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Sample Editor


SRob

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I just recently purchased the macprovideo.com Logic 8 101 video, but can't find an in depth tutorial of the Sample Editor in it. For those of you who have the 201 Steve H Masterclass video, does it cover the Sample Editor in depth?

 

I also the first Logic Pro 8 book, I'm guessing the second might do the same, but I am not the best at learning without seeing it done.

 

Though I'm sure I don't even know all that the Sample Editor is capable of, main sorts of things I would love to learn are for example: Recording an acoustic guitar part, and the whole take is golden except like one measure the rhythm is off.

 

I have tried to sort of intuitively select areas and try to move audio around within the sample but really have no clue what I'm doing and on a couple of occasion forgotten to save it and done something crazy, ruining the whole file (still forgetting that the Sample Editor is destructive editing hah).

 

I have gone through the manual a few times and the closest thing I have found is using the pencil tool to take out pops and clicks.

 

Thanks

SRob

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Though I'm sure I don't even know all that the Sample Editor is capable of, main sorts of things I would love to learn are for example: Recording an acoustic guitar part, and the whole take is golden except like one measure the rhythm is off.

 

I have tried to sort of intuitively select areas and try to move audio around within the sample but really have no clue what I'm doing and on a couple of occasion forgotten to save it and done something crazy, ruining the whole file (still forgetting that the Sample Editor is destructive editing hah).

 

Well, if you don't quite know how to operate the sample editor you can expect whacky results :shock: ! I'd probably be the same way if I was running, say, a large construction crane for the first time. Guaranteed that the girders I was supposed to deliver up to the 88th floor would end up in someone's backyard :lol:

 

For what you described, though, you're best off working exclusively in the arrange page, cutting regions and moving them around. Or, setting up auto-drop to punch in on that one measure that was flubbed. These are examples of two much simpler, straight-forward approaches to the situation you described.

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Thanks for the reply, and nice crane analogy haha.

 

Ok cool, so then what sorts of things do you guys use the Sample Editor mostly for? I guess just by the name of it, and how complex it looks, I thought I should be using it for what I'm trying to do.

 

Also, if I'm cutting regions and moving them around, do you usually do Strip Silence first?

 

And I never really thought about it, but do any of you usually do cycle record on a certain part of the song, and just play the part a few times in case the first take has problem areas, kind of like insurance?

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Thanks for the reply, and nice crane analogy haha.

 

Ok cool, so then what sorts of things do you guys use the Sample Editor mostly for? I guess just by the name of it, and how complex it looks, I thought I should be using it for what I'm trying to do.

 

Also, if I'm cutting regions and moving them around, do you usually do Strip Silence first?

 

And I never really thought about it, but do any of you usually do cycle record on a certain part of the song, and just play the part a few times in case the first take has problem areas, kind of like insurance?

 

People record using different methods. I cycle record instruments so that I can then pick out the best take, or create a comp track of the best takes. When I do vocals, I just do a one-shot through, and then auto-punch into areas that I think need fixing.

 

However, sometimes I'll cycle record vocals and just sing a verse (or even just a phrase) in different harmonies, just kind of improvise off the top of my head, and see if I have any new ideas that I might like.

 

You can record in any way that you feel comfortable.

 

As for the Strip Silence question-- it depends on what you're planning to do. If you just recorded a drum kit, and you can hear some of the snare bleeding into the kick drum track, then yes, I would Strip Silence. But if I'm just cutting guitar lines, or synth lines, I just cut, and move. Later on, if there are pops and click, I create crossfades in between the regions.

 

Sample Editor-- as you realized, it's destructive. Some people use it for certain effects. Like, let's say you have a track of cymbal hits. You have a feeling that one section of the song could use a backward cymbal to really create a nice "rise" into the final chorus. Now, you wouldn't just open up the region of cymbal hits in your Sample Editor and just reverse one cymbal, because then ALL the regions that use that audio file will have the cymbal reversed. You don't want that. What you do is make a selection (hightlight) the sample, then in the Audio section of the Sample Editor window menu, you save the selection as a NEW file. Call it "Cymbal Reversed"... You open it up in your Audio Bin, drop it into the project, open the file up in the Sample Editor, click on Function>Reverse, and there you go. One single cymbal file reversed!

 

You would then, of course, change the anchor position so that you can properly set it in your arrangement.

 

You should probably watch this two-part video by SF Logic Ninja to help you better understand Audio Regions as well as the Sample Editor:

 

 

In fact, you should subscribe to his YouTube profile and watch ALL of his videos. They're amazing, and you'll be learning A LOT.

 

Hope this helps!

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