Jump to content

10,000 RPM HDD vs. Solid State Internal HD


Recommended Posts

I know that Solid State HD's are fast, but they are also a little expensive for such a small amount of storage space. I want the fastest speeds available for an audio drive and my sample library. So, I was thinking about running a combination of these drives on a Mac Pro and was wondering if anyone would like to comment on both the speed and reliability of these hard drives. Thank you.

 

- xpander

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Without knowing the specs of your system or what exactly you're trying to do, it's probably difficult to comment on the components in question. I just wanted to weigh in with my own experience, that I've never been limited by my 7200rpm external drive.

 

I recently ordered a SATA drive from Soundsonline with three more libraries on it, and that is 7200rpm as well.

 

Just my two cents.

 

-Bruce

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I want the fastest speeds available for an audio drive and my sample library.

 

The fastest drive available is probably a 15,000 rpm SAS drive. However those are usually a bad choice for most professional audio use. Is there any particular reason you want the fastest speed available? Most professionals use 7,200 rpm SATA drives as they are usually the best choice for audio, being designed for single user desktop stations, providing a short seek time, excellent reliability and the best quality/price ratio on the market.

 

Sometimes the fastest is not the best.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for your replies. I have been considering the WD "Raptor" 10,000 RPM drives because of their short seek time. For the most part, I am spending much more time editing audio that I have created or processed with Kyma and Bias Peak Pro. Honestly, I haven't had any problems with 7200 RPM SATA's. The WD drives were a suggestion from a colleague of mine who has been using them for a few years now. As for the SSD's, I could just be getting caught up in "the hype" about them being faster than regular HD's. I really don't know much about them. This is my reason for posting my question here. I am simply curious about any experience others may have. Thanks again.

 

- xpander

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Honestly, I haven't had any problems with 7200 RPM SATA's.

 

That's the reason everybody uses them, they're fast enough, they don't overheat, they are reliable, they don't make too much noise, don't suck too much power etc... anything that rotates faster is likely to have any or all of the aforementioned issues.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

sorry to revive the thread, but I need a new pair of HDDs and was thinking about the new seagate 5900RPM (2GB SATA3). They're cheap, same sustained output of a 7200RPM (according to Seagate´s site) but 12ms seek time opposed to 9ms on a 7200. Also less noise, heat and consumption... Am I wrong? Will see any benefit from a 7200 nowadays?. Do the slower ones last longer or are more secure?.

regards

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok, thanks. Can you please elaborate why?

10db less on each drive and 64MB cache looked nice. I never use 60 tracks @96KHz... more like 30 @48KHZ but also a bunch of heavy EXS.

The drives will reside on a FW800 external housing

Previous ones were seagates 7200-12. One already failed. a little more than a year of medium use. So I take your WD suggestion seriously.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Honestly, I haven't had any problems with 7200 RPM SATA's.

 

That's the reason everybody uses them, they're fast enough, they don't overheat, they are reliable, they don't make too much noise, don't suck too much power etc... anything that rotates faster is likely to have any or all of the aforementioned issues.

 

I recently installed additional 2TB Seagate Barr.... 7.2k RPM in my macpro (I don't remember in which topic David suggested that model) but they work flawless! Greatest upgrade I done on that tower! :)

I got mine for 169$ or something from newegg.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thanks for the answers.

 

The message is clear. I was hoping that the quieter and cheaper drives were fast enough, but it seems not...

 

Seagate..... hmmm. not very happy with them lately. I want to replace both because one failed; I don't want to risk another fail with the remaining one. Maybe the newer ones are better, but ATM I'd like to buy a WD.

 

regards from Madrid

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...