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Does Logic Pro only record as high as 24 bit?


sonicguy

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24-bits isn't a rate, it's a depth (bit-depth). Sampling rate is where you talk about rates (44.1, 48, etc.)

 

No one needs higher than 24 bits to record, really. The dynamic range of 24-bit recordings is so vast to begin with.

 

Just curious, what are you recording that you need more dynamic range (and thus more bits to accommodate)?

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Your Apogee converters have a dynamic range of 120 dB. That means at the most you're only using 21 of the 24 bits.

 

This is precisely the point - The analog part in the signal chain, including the analog side of the ADCs, is limited in its dynamic range for many reasons. Every additional bit means doubled sensitivity, but from a certain point there is more noise than useful signal, and all this and possible truncation artifacts is way under your (or anyone's) threshold of hearing.

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Trying to get a higher quality recording by using greater bit depth and sampling rate...

 

...when you have untreated recording spaces, unpolished performances, and low quality mics & preamps...

 

...is like triple bolt-locking and steel-reinforcing your front door against thieves...

 

...when you've left your back door and all your windows wide open.

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I appreciate what you all are saying. Great points, really. I guess Cubase is maybe the only DAW that's pushing the envelop in this regard. And I understand it's a 32 bit floating point of sorts. But I'm not a gear expert. I honestly thought everyone was heading in this direction. My mistake. At some point there will be a movement to greater bit depths. But maybe that will just be a gimmick to sell new gear and won't help make better recordings.

Matt makes a great point about a first having a good environment for recording, great performance, etc... We all listen to and love old recordings made on what would be considered substandard gear by modern measure. It's the performances that drive these old recordings. We all now have home studios that would have cost hundreds of thousands in the old days. And for the most part we use this gift to produce garbage. (or just as laboratories to analyze and formulate arguments for or against hardware/ software/ techniques)

I subscribe to this philosophy of keeping it simple, really. You're all doing a great job keeping me on that path.

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And I understand it's a 32 bit floating point of sorts.

 

Virtually *all* DAWs are 32float systems. That doesn't mean *recording* audio at 32-bit fixed point is beneficial in any way. It's pointless (imo) - but a 32f mixer needs that implementation to give headroom and room for processing audio.

 

There are a few systems that will record to 32-bit files. And I see that of the few people using it, 90% of them just do it because they think that "32 is better than 24, so I'll do that", reducing their track counts and processor performance accordingly. The remaining few might have a good reason and have the technical and engineering chops to understand what and why they are doing it.

 

But I don't think there are many.

 

But I'm not a gear expert. I honestly thought everyone was heading in this direction. My mistake. At some point there will be a movement to greater bit depths.

 

Once you understand the technical engineery side a bit better, you'll realise that bigger numbers don't always automatically mean better. :)

 

It's a bit like spending an extra three hundred grand to get a car that will do 600mph. It's an interesting technical exercise, but pointless and impractical for 99.9% of practicality.

 

But maybe that will just be a gimmick to sell new gear and won't help make better recordings.

 

Marketing people like bigger numbers. It helps sell things, I guess. :shrugs:

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