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Panning problems when sending to BUS


Acesulfame

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(Logic 5.5

Windows XP)

 

I'm using a primative version of Logic but hope someone can educate me on this.

 

To save CPU usage I want to set up a BUS with various plugins such as EQ/low pass filter etc and send 4 tracks of

 

rhythm guitars to that BUS in order to receive all those effects on the 4 tracks. However, when I do this the

 

guitar track which is panned hard left no longer becomes panned hard left but inward slightly. When I turn up the

 

level of BUS which that track receives it pans it back into the centre even more.

 

How can I send multiple tracks to a BUS and it not affect the panning of the orginal tracks? I read somewhere that

 

you can route the BUS to an AUX channel but I've tried this also and am having the same issues. Sorry if this

 

description isn't clear but I'm hoping someone out there has experienced the same thing or can relate and give me

 

a hand.

 

Cheers!

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Setting the send to post pan will certainly work to preserve the panning but be aware the aux at the end of the bus will only be EQing a split-off copy of the signal, not the whole signal. If parallel processing was your goal here, then fine but I suspect that you are wanting to EQ the whole signal.

 

To do that, change the output of all your guitar tracks to the same bus (and turn off the sends for that bus). To change a guitar track's output setting, click the "Stereo Out" button on the channel strip in the mixer. When you route the signal this way, the whole signal is going to the aux, not just a copy. And the panning on the individual guitar tracks will be preserved.

 

And on this "guitar submix aux" you also have the option of using the aux's sends to route some of the guitar submix to a reverb for instance.

 

EDIT: I just re-read your post and noticed that you are using Logic 5. OK, so if you actually do use an aux channel at the end of the bus, you'll need to deal with any potential bus objects that you may have created in this process. (Bus objects - or you could call them bus channel strips - look a lot like aux channel strips except they have no sends of their own.) If there is a bus object, the simplest thing is to select the bus object in the mixer or the environment window and set it's output to "no output". That will ensure that you don't have yet one more copy of the signal that is going to the output with no EQ on it.

 

You may be asking why you need the aux at all if there is already a bus channel strip with it's own volume fader and insert slots. Yes, you could do it that way. But, as mentioned, bus objects have no sends of their own so you wouldn't be able to send a bit of the guitar submix to a reverb.

 

One way you could get around that is to put a reverb directly on the bus, at the end of the processing chain. But now you'll have to open the reverb and change the dry wet setting every time you want to tweak that. Better to use an aux for the guitar submix, put all your EQs and comps on there and then send from the aux to another (bus or aux) channel that just has reverb on it.

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Firstly thanks for taking the time to write such a long in depth response!

 

I've realised that to achieve what I want, all I have to do is not send the guitar tracks to buses, but to change each guitar track's output to "bus 1" for example. Then bus 1 doesn't change the panning at all but they still get the bus' effects.

 

I have no idea what auxes are for... The way I've got it routed with tracks being outputted through buses seems to work fine. Is this wrong in any way for any reason cos it just seems to easy?

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I have no idea what auxes are for... The way I've got it routed with tracks being outputted through buses seems to work fine. Is this wrong in any way for any reason cos it just seems to easy?

 

It's not wrong at all.

 

You can use sends instead of outputting via a bus to, for example, send several channels to one aux with an effect on it. So, say you want four channels to go through the same reverb, but want different amounts of reverb on them, you'd have different send amounts on those four channels going to the same aux channel with a reverb plugin on it.

 

There's a bunch of other situations where you might want to use sends instead of outputting via a bus, but that's a typical example.

 

As for guitars, I frequently want to send guitar to a couple of different mic emulations/impulse responses. Because I need the signal routed to more than one output, I have to use sends because channels only have one output option. So I have my sends at unity gain (0.0 on the "send" knob), and set the channel to "no output" (otherwise the clean guitar would be heard too).

 

Make sense?

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Firstly thanks for taking the time to write such a long in depth response!

 

I've realised that to achieve what I want, all I have to do is not send the guitar tracks to buses, but to change each guitar track's output to "bus 1" for example. Then bus 1 doesn't change the panning at all but they still get the bus' effects.

 

Yes, that's what I was advocating for that very reason.

 

I have no idea what auxes are for... The way I've got it routed with tracks being outputted through buses seems to work fine. Is this wrong in any way for any reason cos it just seems to easy?

 

In present day Logic, users would be reversing that question, simply because the default behaviour any time you create a send with a new bus is that it creates a corresponding new aux at the end of it. You don't even see a bus channel strip, only the sends, their assignment to particular buses and the various auxes that the buses output to.

 

So, what are bus channels strips for? So you can have a volume control on your bus line and also populate it with reverbs and other effects.

 

What are Auxes for? You could think of an aux as a bus channel strip with sends, as I previously mentioned and that would be true as far as it goes but auxes, in conjunction with bus lines can do far more than that. Consider this - using the same bus, you could have three different auxes at the end of the same bus line. Note, I didn't say bus channel strip, because essentially a bus is just a stereo line that can go from anywhere to anywhere. One bus can output to many destinations and receive from multiple destination. If this doesn't make any sense to you, re-read it carefully.

 

Send -> bus 1 > aux 1 (for general purpose reverb for several different tracks)

 

Output -> bus 1 -> [ aux 1 & aux 2 ] (for parallel processing)

 

[ch1 output + ch2 output + ch3 output] -> bus 1 -> aux 1 -> aux 1 send -> bus 2 -> aux 2 with reverb (for submixing several channels and then adding effects to the submix)

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