Jump to content

Apple... Is it just me?


Recommended Posts

I'm an Apple fan like anybody here i guess, but,... I just watch the recent keynote for the iPad mini,etc, and i just can't stand anymore of that attitude that they think they're all Gods and that they're producing divine-level devices. Ive's tone and gesture in his videos makes me want to throw up. I didn't have this feeling after watching Jobs' keynotes. I don't know, is it just me?

 

Blink

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did have a little bit of that feeling already with Jobs. That's Apple's tone, definitely. But what else would you suggest? I mean have you ever seen a Ballmer keynote? :lol:

 

But to be honest I've stopped watching Apple keynotes (or being excited about new product launches). I'd rather spend time with my kids!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do agree with you Blink, that Apples keynote speeches have often had some of that elitism associated with whatever it is that is being launched or re-branded etc. It is this attitude and approach that leads many people to the view that Apple is all high and mighty. I must admit that I have never watched the keynotes, and, like David, prefer to spend time with my kids or... even at the Mac.

 

What I will add here though, is that regardless of what you think of the keynotes, their messages, or of whatever it is that is being 'keynoted'... I will never buy a Windows based PC/Laptop ever again... not that these are so bad, but that the end-to-end experience of using Apple products really is so very much better. Yes, Apple do very much talk the talk, but they also most certainly walk the walk.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Except for a couple of minutes once, I've never watched a whole keynote speech. I do have a couple of PC loving friends (and one Ubuntu user) who HATE what they see as the high and mighty Apple approach. I tell them, hey, it's just a computer!

 

I don't give a s**t about the Mac vs PC debate; if a given machine works for you, then great.

 

That being said, I love the Samsung Galaxy ads where they take the piss out of Mac users standing in line at a store (something else I'm never gonna do).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's just you.

 

What, you think they should tone it down to fit some idea of what makes a "humble" company or something? They should shrug and duck and say, "I dunno, maybe this new product is kind of cool, maybe not. We're sure not gonna brag about it or anything. We don't want to seem, you know, like, arrogant."

 

Yeah, that's totally how you sell it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not being funny. I've worked in advertising and MarComm for over 30 years, for everybody from Fortune 100 companies like Bank One and Discover Card and Dow to the corner florist, and you don't become the world's most visible and most highly capitalized company by feigning modesty. You tell everybody all the time that this thing you're unveiling is the greatest damn thing that ever existed.

 

And when you happen to be Apple, and you've already re-invented home computing and the music industry and are moving on to topple the power structure in television, there's nothing to be modest about. Apple is, whether you like it or not, the planet's most important company, and has fundamentally changed the way people run a business.

 

So, to answer your question... Yes, if these facts piss you off, then it's just you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry Gravity Jim. it's not just Blink. I feel the same way. As did David up there earlier in the thread. I'm a 15 year apple devotee when it comes to computing, and of course Mac is the best. No question. But they didn't "change the world" Steve Jobs isn't the "messiah" or a genius, they were just dong what a whole lot of people were doing, but they did it the best.

 

I actually got on the forums to rant about apple and found this thread. Nice coincidence.

You know what I'm pissed about? This blackout of information until the release date with regards to Apple products. I've bought logic for the last 10 years, and I just did a clean install, so should I reinstall logic 9? Like what's the f'in point. What are they protecting? I find it kind of lame, and a snub to all the people that helped them become the super company (the creative types and artsys like us) We make our living on these products and to not have any communication so I can base some work around it, well that's just kind of rude, Anyways. Just a rant. sorry.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep, the blackout policy is a PITA, to say the least. My wife just bought a 13 inch laptop literally days before Apple announced that they now had retina display for that screen size. We asked at the store if that was an option for the laptop she wanted and of course the salesperson told us it was only available in the 15 inch.

 

I don't think Jobs was a messiah, more like a cranky, arrogant and very pushy leader who had a passion for keeping ahead of the tech wave. And because of that, I really believe that the kind of innovations we've seen appear - touch screens, app store, itunes etc, etc - have speeded up a process that, in the hands of other industry leaders, would have taken far longer to achieve. I don't think it's an exaggeration to suggest that everyone is at least 10 years ahead of where we'd be without a company like Apple pushing the development curve.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

well said Camillo, I agree totally. And although my profile says, Montreal, I'm in vancouver for the next month. Hi neighbour!

 

Welcome to the city of three seasons - right now you've hit the long rainy one. It's like an endless fall that slowly segues into spring and bypasses what most of the rest of the country calls winter! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Times change... I never watched a keynote (why should I - Americans' speech is so hard to understand for clumsy Germans), but I don't like how things develop. Most Apple people (and I'm talking of users!) have always appeared something between arrogant and disoriented (regarding technical fundamentals) to me, but hey - Apple built powerful machines while the "IBM compatible" PCs were crappy. After starting with Ohio Scientific's Superboard II (6502) and then Commodore's 64 (6502 derivate), my way was from Atari ST (68000) to Apple's 7300 (Power PC) - they had better processors than the PC stuff and a neat user interface, and they were different and not what all people were after. This is the other side of arrogance... The wish to be different by using different and more sophisticated computers.

Nowadays... Everything is so... iPhonish. And this is true for non-Apple products as well. Smart cell phones and omnipresent connectedness is where the money is, a legal drug that everybody is told to be longing for, and it's so easy to catch the kids with this. I see Apple's pioneering role fade away if they forget to attend to a limited group of individuals with high demands. If it's all "make it tinier and thinner, and everybody wants it", the vision is gone that was Apple.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Times change... I never watched a keynote (why should I - Americans' speech is so hard to understand for clumsy Germans), but I don't like how things develop. Most Apple people (and I'm talking of users!) have always appeared something between arrogant and disoriented (regarding technical fundamentals) to me, but hey - Apple built powerful machines while the "IBM compatible" PCs were crappy. After starting with Ohio Scientific's Superboard II (6502) and then Commodore's 64 (6502 derivate), my way was from Atari ST (68000) to Apple's 7300 (Power PC) - they had better processors than the PC stuff and a neat user interface, and they were different and not what all people were after. This is the other side of arrogance... The wish to be different by using different and more sophisticated computers.

Nowadays... Everything is so... iPhonish. And this is true for non-Apple products as well. Smart cell phones and omnipresent connectedness is where the money is, a legal drug that everybody is told to be longing for, and it's so easy to catch the kids with this. I see Apple's pioneering role fade away if they forget to attend to a limited group of individuals with high demands. If it's all "make it tinier and thinner, and everybody wants it", the vision is gone that was Apple.

 

I started on Macs working in a lab in university. They always worked flawlessly, so when it came time to upgrade from my Commodore 64, Apple was my obvious choice, since I knew my way around with the programs I was using at the time. I knew people with PCs who were having all kinds of trouble with peripherals, software, etc., and having to constantly tinker with the innards to get their machines to work. I'm not the tinkering type. I know how to drive, but don't ask me what's under the hood. When someone starts talking to me about a double overhead cam engine, my eyes glaze over. I just want the machine to do what I want/need it to do, and let it handle things in the background. Up to now, I've been quite happy with my Macs (and now iPad). That is starting to change, however, because I don't know if I like the direction things have been going in, and I would agree that everything now is geared toward iDevices, and being told what we need. Apple, since eliminating the floppy drive in 1998, has been steadily either ahead of the curve, or defining the curve. Sometimes, I wish there was an alternative.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:!: The yet to be released new imac looks great! :!:

Apple users being 'arrogant and disoriented', whatever bro........

I've watched a few keynotes, hell i once watched a couple chicks pull a third of each others hair out after the bar closed. I'm not sure what me watching either of them is suppose to mean(keynote or hair brawl).

I like their functionality and style (the chicks).

 

 

Tshh

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Alright, 10 years is certainly a guesstimate. But when I look at how Apple has re-defined so many aspects of personal computing, music players, cell phones and music distribution over their entire history, it seems to me that they have been major trend setters.

 

Even though they didn't invent the touch screen and also borrowed from zerox in the their early years of developing user interfaces, it has been Apple who took the plunge and really used what was out there to do things in a (usually) much more elegant way than the competion. And whether that competition has been a Microsoft or a Samsung, they've been imitating Apple for years.

 

That's the sense in which I think that Apple has speeded up development. Eventually, graphic user interfaces rather than command lines would have become the norm and ditto for touch screens. Apple just made things like these happen sooner than everyone else could make them happen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[...] Apple users being 'arrogant and disoriented', whatever bro........

 

Yeah, whatever. I'm one of them, too...

 

Alright, 10 years is certainly a guesstimate. But when I look at how Apple has re-defined so many aspects of personal computing, music players, cell phones and music distribution over their entire history, it seems to me that they have been major trend setters.

 

Even though they didn't invent the touch screen and also borrowed from zerox in the their early years of developing user interfaces, it has been Apple who took the plunge and really used what was out there to do things in a (usually) much more elegant way than the competion. And whether that competition has been a Microsoft or a Samsung, they've been imitating Apple for years.

 

That's the sense in which I think that Apple has speeded up development. Eventually, graphic user interfaces rather than command lines would have become the norm and ditto for touch screens. Apple just made things like these happen sooner than everyone else could make them happen.

 

They sure did this. I understand "Ten years ahead" is not to be taken as a scientifically exact phrase, it's true anyway. I think this thread was started out of a vague feeling the era of Apple re-defining aspects of computing and being major trend setters might be surpassed if they don't find new goals other than this even-better-iPhones-stuff.

To be honest, I don't know what I would like them to do. Maybe they should still focus on computers for professionals. They need a continued balance of design and content.

 

Of course I missed the point - it's just me growing too old to love iPhones.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...when I look at how Apple has re-defined so many aspects of personal computing, music players, cell phones and music distribution over their entire history, it seems to me that they have been major trend setters.

 

Yes, they have been trend setters in terms of form and function. And I'd say that of the four things you mentioned, the iPod is the most innovative though it's led to an acceptance of quantity over quality. iTunes is indeed an amazing implementation of digital distribution, but they're selling MP3's too, and thus, convenience over quality.

 

Cell phones/smart phones have been around forever, so they're nothing new. And almost without fail, everyone I know with an iPhone complains about its audio quality as well as the crap connectivity they have with AT&T. If I ever want to have a barely intelligible cell phone conversation, all I have to do is call a friend who has an iPhone.

 

And really, they haven't done much in terms of computing, save for package up faster processors and move the furniture around OS-wise. Think about it... we're still using windows, the Finder, and there hasn't been any real significant innovation in file organization or presentation since the Atari days. And to this day, compared to the feel and snappy graphics of OS9 on my G4, my MacPro with all the bells and whistles is downright sluggish.

 

In terms of packaging, however, I have to give 'em 5 stars. The build quality of just about everything from power cords to computer case design is superb. But at the end of the day, my view of Apple is that they mainly excel at repackaging existing technologies, including our old friend Logic. And that's what they call "innovation".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good perspective ski. Myself, as a relative neophyte to the world of computing, (8 or 9 years) haven't really lived and worked with computers over the long haul. I get what you're saying about the difference between repackaging and innovation.

 

In terms of OS development, it's been a case of leapfrogging development between different OS designers so it's difficult to say how it all would have played out without an Apple company in game.

 

I still think that Apple has made it's contribution, with drag and drop file management, great icons, integrated systems, their Pods and Pads and also with it's use of UNIX, a system architecture with twice the history of PC's architecture and all the bug improvements inherent in that.

 

I don't know if it's true that Mac's crash less than PCs (I know that mine seems to do much better than my PC friends but that's a small sample we're talking) but now that Apple is bigger than Microsoft, are they going to become unwieldy and Titanic-like and crash on the shores of stagnation? (Sorry, could resist a twisted metaphor.) :roll: :)

 

For sure, the iPhone is a complete irony - high res screen, tight integration of many functions and now the iPhone alone is worth more than Microsoft these days but yep, bad reception! Oddly, when my wife calls from San Francisco, it's totally scratchy but all clear if I call her.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...