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Apple loops and song key [SOLVED]


alexfsu

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everytime I put the loop in D# (the key of my track) and press play in puts it back in "song key"

Sounds like you just previewed the loop in D#, from the "Play in" menu at the bottom of the loop browser? That's only for previewing. Once dragged in the Arrange area a loop plays in the key of the project unless you change its transpose parameter (region parameters at the top of the inspector).

 

The key of your project can be edited in your global tracks, "signature" track. Double-click the signature (default should be C) then choose your key.

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everytime I put the loop in D# (the key of my track) and press play in puts it back in "song key"

Sounds like you just previewed the loop in D#, from the "Play in" menu at the bottom of the loop browser? That's only for previewing. Once dragged in the Arrange area a loop plays in the key of the project unless you change its transpose parameter (region parameters at the top of the inspector).

 

The key of your project can be edited in your global tracks, "signature" track. Double-click the signature (default should be C) then choose your key.

 

Thanks David. One more q: is putting the song in D# major the same as C minor?

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everytime I put the loop in D# (the key of my track) and press play in puts it back in "song key"

Sounds like you just previewed the loop in D#, from the "Play in" menu at the bottom of the loop browser? That's only for previewing. Once dragged in the Arrange area a loop plays in the key of the project unless you change its transpose parameter (region parameters at the top of the inspector).

 

The key of your project can be edited in your global tracks, "signature" track. Double-click the signature (default should be C) then choose your key.

 

Thanks David. One more q: is putting the song in D# major the same as C minor?

 

I don't think loops have minor or major values. They only have a root key value. If you transpose the song signature from D# major to C minor, the loop wil be transposed from D# to C. So if you're using loops in parallel keys, you should transpose them up or down by three semitones.

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Sorry if I'm not fully understanding: so loops in the key of C will work harmonically with a track in the key of D#? I ask because that current format seems to work, although I don't claim to have perfect pitch. :)

 

ALL loops can be transposed to any key. It is impossible for me to say how well they match harmonically in your case, since I don't know what they sound like.

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Sorry if I'm not fully understanding: so loops in the key of C will work harmonically with a track in the key of D#? I ask because that current format seems to work, although I don't claim to have perfect pitch. :)

 

ALL loops can be transposed to any key. It is impossible for me to say how well they match harmonically in your case, since I don't know what they sound like.

 

Well I asked because D# major and C minor have the same notes in their respective scales, so wouldn't they technically match harmonically?

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Although D# and Eb are enharmonically the same note, 99.9% of the time in the real world you will refer to this key as Eb, because it is a flat key signature, ie. 3 flats, also known as C minor. The key signature of D# major would be 9 sharps, and I've never seen it. The relative minor of D# major would be B# minor, I've never seen that either.

 

If apple loops does not distinguish between minor and major, then your ears will have to. If you're in Eb major, and the loops says "Eb" and it sounds too dissonant, try moving it down 3 semitones to C. The relative minor is always 3 half steps below its related major key.

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Sorry if I'm not fully understanding: so loops in the key of C will work harmonically with a track in the key of D#? I ask because that current format seems to work, although I don't claim to have perfect pitch. :)

 

ALL loops can be transposed to any key. It is impossible for me to say how well they match harmonically in your case, since I don't know what they sound like.

 

Well I asked because D# major and C minor have the same notes in their respective scales, so wouldn't they technically match harmonically?

Yes, but does it matter? Logic transposes loops automatically regardless of the original scale. As far as I know, this transposition is done by matching the loop key with the song key, major or minor, doesn't matter. If the song is in major and the loop is in minor then the loop should be MANUALLY transposed three semitones down. I hope someone who's more familiar with using Apple loops could confirm this.

 

Here's a quote from the manual:

They are played back at the project key by default, which is defined by the first key signature event. No distinction is made between major and minor keys for these global transposition functions; in fact, only the root of the initial key signature is relevant for playback of Apple Loops
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Well I asked because D# major and C minor have the same notes in their respective scales, so wouldn't they technically match harmonically?

Yes, in MOST cases, you can use a D#major loop in the key of C minor. But whether or not it will work is up to your ears. You can manually transpose loops using the transpose parameter in the region parameters (top of the inspector).

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Yes, in MOST cases, you can use a D#major loop in the key of C minor. But whether or not it will work is up to your ears. You can manually transpose loops using the transpose parameter in the region parameters (top of the inspector).

 

Understood, thanks David.

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