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Where/How to Save?


jster

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So I got one external drive for the samples.

 

I got another for my projects.

 

Suppose I open a new project and do some recording. But suppose I haven't saved it. Where is it saved at that point? Or should I have saved it the moment I opened it? I was under the impression that I was supposed to have an external drive for read/write maximiztion and latency elimination rather than simply storage. If that is correct, then how do I make sure that everything I record is put on that external drive immediately?

 

Thanks

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Suppose I open a new project and do some recording. But suppose I haven't saved it. Where is it saved at that point?

It resides under your-home-folder/Music/Logic/ - but it's not saved per se: if you close it, it will be deleted.

 

Or should I have saved it the moment I opened it?

Do you mean the instant you create it? If that's what you mean then yes, IMO you should manually save your project upon its creation and before you do any work in it. Saving means choosing a location and name, so you know where the project is, it will have the name you gave it, and it won't be deleted when you close it. Logic now has an auto-save feature, but I still highly recommend you save manually so that you can stay in control.

 

I was under the impression that I was supposed to have an external drive for read/write maximiztion and latency elimination rather than simply storage.

I'm not sure what you mean by read/write maximization or latency elimination (I've never heard those terms before), but external drives are generally slower than internal drives. On the other hand, it is recommended, when possible, to save your project to a drive that is different than your system drive. If that 2nd drive can be an internal one, that's the best solution. If it cannot, then you can consider an external drive but then you'll have to balance out what you gained by using a 2nd drive with the fact that, depending on that 2nd drive and the protocol used to connect it to the Mac (Thunderbolt, eSATA, FW800, USB3, USB2....), that 2nd drive may be slower than your system drive.

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Interesting. So if you had a really slow external hard drive, you might not want to put the project there until the end.

 

Well, I got a macmini, so no second internal is possible.

 

I saw a video where the guy was explaining that is best to have samples on an external drive because then the internal drive doesn't have to stop writing every time it wants to read--hard drives can only do one at a time. Plus I had read that three drives was the way to go. Here's the video:

 

 

So I thought that something similar must happen with the project. If it is saved externally then the internal drive doesn't have to stop reading every time it wants to write (your guitar recording bytes).

 

I'm saddened to hear that the external ones are too slow. Should I get something with thuderbolt maybe? And if so,which would get priority? Samples or projects?

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Well, I got a macmini, so no second internal is possible.

It's possible! http://www.ifixit.com/Store/Mac/Mac-Mini-Dual-Drive-Kit/IF171-005

 

I saw a video where the guy was explaining that is best to have samples on an external drive because then the internal drive doesn't have to stop writing every time it wants to read--hard drives can only do one at a time.

The guy in the video was assuming that you can only have a single internal hard drive. I see that a lot: people recommend an external drive when really what they want to recommend is a 2nd drive, wether it's internal or external. And internal drives are generally faster than external ones.

 

Plus I had read that three drives was the way to go.

There's no "way to go". There are needs and solutions. I have clients who crank out top 40 hits one after the other who work on a laptop in the plane with a single internal hard drive. That doesn't mean it'll work for you, that just means that there's no absolute law that says you need tons of RAM or 5 drives or anything. It depends on your needs. A dance music producer doesn't have the same needs as an orchestral film composer.

 

So I thought that something similar must happen with the project. If it is saved externally then the internal drive doesn't have to stop reading every time it wants to write (your guitar recording bytes).

The question is: does your internal drive stop every time it wants to write your guitar? For example, if you internal isn't working when it needs to write the guitar, then using a 2nd drive to write the guitar will not speed up anything. HDs don't read/write in a continuous manner, but in bursts.

 

I'm saddened to hear that the external ones are too slow. Should I get something with thuderbolt maybe?

You should first define what your needs are. If you end up determining that you do indeed need a 2nd drive, your best bet would be to go internal, and if you don't want to do that, Thunderbolt would be best.

 

To sums this all up: if it ain't broken, don't fix it. If you get issues, errors, alerts etc... then you should research how to make them go away. Depending on what you do, the issue or the alerts, you may determine that you need a 2nd drive, but you may determine that you need more RAM, or a faster CPU. If your need is a faster CPU, or more RAM, then adding a 2nd drive won't help a bit.

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I actually bought two external 5400 hard drives, but as I said in the other thread, I got the error message--it seems because the samples drive was the culprit. The guy at the store was kind enough to take them back 3 weeks later. So I got the credit. Now I gotta figure out what to buy.
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I actually bought two external 5400 hard drives, but as I said in the other thread, I got the error message--it seems because the samples drive was the culprit. The guy at the store was kind enough to take them back 3 weeks later. So I got the credit. Now I gotta figure out what to buy.

 

External SSDs are pointless if they're not Thunderbolt.

 

External Firewire 800 and USB 3.0 spinning 7200 rpm drives should work fine.

 

So make sure that whatever store you go to they have drives that are high performance and spinning at 7200 rpm, like G-Tech.

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