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Duke
Topic Author
Posts: 21
Joined: Fri Mar 19, 2010 6:04 am

Adding lyrics to an unmelodied score

Wed May 26, 2021 9:01 am

I would like to create a score with chords and lyrics for musicians to follow in the studio. You can't lyric and tab without notes , and the lyric tool don't like to put words where rests are as what occurs when you open a blank midi region.
iMac Intel Core 2 Duo 2.16 GHz, Logic Pro 9.1.0, Phonic 808 Firewire interface
 
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Atlas007
Posts: 9835
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 11:58 pm
Location: Montreal

Re: Adding lyrics to an unmelodied score

Thu May 27, 2021 8:25 pm

If you need to tabulate lyrics, Logic indeed needs notes on the staff to line up same. That's the very purpose of that function.

If all you need are written chords symbols over lyrics, have you considered hiding the notes and the staff and using TEXT's part (instead of LYRIC's one)?
As you will see, that is all feasible but a rather cumbersome workflow (IMHO), which can be saved as a template anyhow for eventual re-use...

AFAIK, that can also be achieved simply by using a basic word processor... Isn't?
LogicPro 10.6.3, MainStage3.5.3
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MikeRobinson
Posts: 1099
Joined: Thu Nov 05, 2015 3:42 pm
Location: Just south of Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA.

Re: Adding lyrics to an unmelodied score

Fri May 28, 2021 3:10 pm

Also – if your target is, indeed, "a score," consider https://musescore.org.

This is a full-featured, open source, music-scoring package which "runs on everything," and I have been thoroughly satisfied with it.

Even though Logic has an excellent "score" function of its own, the underlying data that it must always work with is: "a time-sequenced series of discrete events," which it tries to present as an acceptable score. Whereas, a true "music-scoring" program takes the opposite approach: it represents the score exactly as it might be printed, then offers an approximately-rendered musical playback. Both programs support "MusicXML" as a common-to-both interchange standard.

I've used both programs in tandem with very fine results.
Mike Robinson
"I wanna quit being a computer consultant and become a composer and arranger at age fifty-nevermind."
Logic Pro X, MacBook Pro, 88-key MIDI controller.
Just south of Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA