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Bootable copy . Which one . CCC or Super Duper


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I need to back up Mojave and logic 10.5.1 .

what is the most reliable carbon copy cloner or super duper.!I have no experience with either program or how to do this .  Any help appreciated !!!

also what type of hardrive also etc ?

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Disk Utility can clone any volume, for free..  It always makes an exact clone and wipes the destination.  It also does not by default automatically copy some of the hidden partitions that are needed to fully copy a boot drive.  Your boot disk has the main volume that you see and then there are hidden volumes containing other stuff.  Its pretty simple on Mojave, but starts to get way more complicated with newer versions of MacOS.  With newer versions of MacOS I think you have to use some complicated command line tools to fully clone a drive, but I can't remember now.

CCC and SuperDuper can do so called incremental updates, where it will only copy over the files that have actually changed.  They both do a lot of smart stuff about not copying over cache files, virtual memory, etc..stuff that doesn't need to be copied.   With Mojave either one will create a bootable backup for you.  I have purchased and used both pieces of software and like them both.

However be advised that starting with Mojave, Apple introduced the APFS file system, and they also at some point in time, I can't remember when now; introduced a system whereby a lot of the files they we should not mess with are stored on a hidden read only partition, etc..and some other new internal hidden partitions related to boot up and recovery, etc..  The end result of that is that neither SuperDuper or CCC could make a truly bootable backup.  There is a command line utility on MacOS you can use to do it, but its very complicated.  Eventually CCC made a way to do it, I think it probably just puts a nice GUI around that cmd line utility.

The CCC author has written a lot of white papers on various things like that which you can access from the CCC site.  In my opinion he has stayed on top of the changes from Apple way way better then Super Duper and I would not even consider using SuperDuper now from where I am on Monterey.  It might be ok on Mojave for now if you prefer that one.  They are both nice pieces of software, but honestly CCC is much more active company.  It gets updated regularly and as I said the guy in charge at CCC writers all the white papers about the backup situation on MacOS rolling forward.

Also the latest versions of CCC have all this stuff built in that is kind of like Time Machine based on using APFS snapshots...so if you need to recover a file from the version it was last Tuesday, you can easily do that in CCC, kind of like its own Time Machine.  (hint hint, like an old version of LogicPro).  But you can't use that particular feature with the actual "bootable" backup unfortunately.  Blame Apple.  CCC has lots of white papers on this topic and are very informative.  

In short I think CCC is the way to go as it is much more modern software and has kept up at every stage with all of Apple's changes, which have all majorly affected the backup situation on MacOS.  If you think you will not be leaving Mojave, SuperDuper would work fine too.  If you want more info, go check out all the blogs at CCC's website...there is TONS of information there about all of this.

 

 

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As a follow up I want to add that in the past on older versions of MacOS...possibly including Mojave, but I can't remember for sure...my backup strategy was to backup twice.  My Mac was backedup by Time Machine, so that I could recover lost files from an exact date.  And then I also had a weekly full bootable backup I was doing with either CCC or SuperDuper..I used to flip back and forth between them because I couldn't decide which I liked better.  That backup was simply so that if I did something like update the OS and find out it sucks, I could boot from the backup and recover back to that, etc.  

So my strategy included two complete backups...which takes a lot of space, but oh well...  When I used Time Machine I used to also back up to a remove network NAS time machine server also...but I find that kind of redundant and complicated.

alright...so now with the latest version of CCC, I took time machine out of the picture.  CCC is actually quite a bit more reliable then Time Machine.  CCC can do this to a single partition within a large drive that may have some other partitions and still has room for more.  Then I also do occasionally full bootable backups with CCC to a completely empty spare drive.   The bootable backup has to use the entire drive.  I especially do that backup right before I update MacOS every time

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While it's true Monterey OS versions etc make bootable clones tricky, Dave (SuperDuper developer) kept users informed as to the development of creating bootable backups (as he, and the CCC authors were all struggling with this at the same time), and also managed to solve that problem a while back.

Quote

 

v3.6.2 now available!

Big Sur (macOS 11) and Monterey (macOS 12) users: we can make bootable Intel and M1 backups: see the Shirt Pocket blog for instructions.

 

There's more info on their blog about this, and what SD does. I expect their solution is pretty much the same as the CCC guys, using ASR, as I believe it's the only way you can update the OS portion of the disk.
https://www.shirt-pocket.com/blog/

I've always had excellent support from Dave usually within an hour on the occasions I've needed it, and SD has saved my bacon many times. I'm not sure why you think that SD isn't somehow modern software, but I at least continue to be perfectly happy with it, including on Monterey. We're lucky to have such good tools available at reasonably inexpensive prices (witness the demise of Diskwarrior, under APFS...)

Also BTW - APFS was introduced with High Sierra, not Mojave...

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APFS itself is not what created the backup challenge...it was a change in BigSur that put part of the OS on a separate read-only partition. Mojave is using APFS but not that read-only change.  But check the blogs and notes from Super Duper and/or CCC, whichever one you like best..  I personally prefer CCC, but everyone is entitled to their favorite.  I bought them both and used them both for periods of time.

Here is a post from CCC blog about the Big Sur change:

 https://bombich.com/blog/2021/05/19/beyond-bootable-backups-adapting-recovery-strategies-evolving-platform

I am loving Monterey.  Not loving the new bugs in recent versions of LogicPro.

Edited by Dewdman42
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“am loving Monterey.  Not loving the new bugs in recent versions of LogicPro.” 

not happy about this ... my whole purpose is to be on a stable logic version with a friend. We both would need to be on the same OS in order to run the same version of logic.

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That's a seperate topic...  Opinions will differ.  

If both of your Macs support Monterey, then I recommend it.  Or at the very least Catalina.  But anyway that is a wide topic and you will got different answers from different people.

As to which LogicPro version you should both use...I don't have an answer..you will be 5 different answers from people on this forum about that question too.  

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40 minutes ago, NoPro said:

We both would need to be on the same OS in order to run the same version of logic 

oh and on this point, you don't both to necessarily be on the same version of MacOS.  But sometimes its hard to obtain older versions of LogicPro once you have upgraded MacOS.  One of you could be on Catalina and one on Mojave, for example, and you basically just use the version of LogicPro that is supported by Mojave.  Catalina will still run that older version of LogicPro.  

 

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but I'm not really sure what the official license policy from Apple is...whether its one license per owner (you) that you can use on multiple computers.  that seems likely since you have one account in the App Store shared across multiple devices and can download LogicPro to any of your own Macs to your heart's content...  So I see no reason to think you can't go ahead and move the 10.5 version over to the Catalina computer as long as that computer is really your computer and your App Store account that it is normally using, etc.  If the real intention is for your friend to use that other Mac with their own app store account, etc..they should buy a copy of LogicPro.  Once you've done that, I don't think it matters how you copy it over.

Edited by Dewdman42
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3 minutes ago, Dewdman42 said:

I'm not really sure what the official license policy from Apple is...whether its one license per owner (you) that you can use on multiple computers.

You can install your Logic Pro license to as many Macs as you have access to but use it on only one at a time. Basically the license allows you to use Logic Pro on a Mac, any Mac you have access to. 

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That would be fine . I own both logic and the computer . I just need a way to get 10.5.1 to the Catalina computer .  I have a backed up copy on the Mojave computer but I’m not sure I can just drag an external hardrive over ? I’d be logged in of course 

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Hey everyone sorry I drifted off topic. I hurt my knee bad and wanted to use the same version of logic on a Mac book pro that I have on my iMac . I have permission etc. . Because the Mac book pro is already on Catalina there’s no way to match my Mojave /logic 10.5.1. I spoke with apple they said can’t be done ...only update or wipe the Catalina Mac book and restore from the Mojave time machine version..truth is I have a relevant question but I’ll start a new post . Thanks everyone .

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  • 4 months later...

hello everybody, I look for download link of Mac Os Sierra to create a bootable installer to revive my 2011 iMac and let it go. It was upgraded with SSD drive and fan control app. Then worked well at High Sierra for few years. Now I wanted to give it away to my family and I wanted to wipe it out and make a clean desk. Then a series of accidents happened with CMD-R combinations. It's trying to reboot with orinal OS (lion) but the file system on SSD is too new... any hints will be  highly apprecciated 

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