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Apple announces new iMacs (and more)


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New 5mm thin, edge to edge glass iMacs were announced today by Apple. The new iMac features Intel quad-core Ivy Bridge processors, NVIDIA Kepler graphics, up to 768GB Flash or up to 3TB HD, wireless 802.11n and up to 32GB RAM: http://www.apple.com/imac/

 

http://images.apple.com/imac/images/performance.jpg

 

Apple also upgraded the Mac mini: http://www.apple.com/mac-mini/

 

http://images.scribblelive.com/2012/10/23/1d544f18-12ac-41d4-9ef9-7a59925ece50.png

 

Apple also announced the new iPad mini: http://www.apple.com/ipad-mini/overview/

 

Apple also upgraded the iPad (4th generation) to a faster A6X processor, FaceTime HD camera and Lightning connection port: http://www.apple.com/ipad/overview/

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The new server, from what I've read, comes stock with 5400 RPM HDDs, not 7200, like the 2011s.

 

Looks like the mini server version might not necessarily be the one to get for Logic users. The mid priced regular version can go quad core and seems like a better deal, and has the option to use Apple's new Fusion Drive™.

 

Looks like a nice price break if you add your own memory and drives.

USB3 has finally arrived for the minis.

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Backed up Logic Projects, existing software disks, CDs into iTunes, backed up photos on disks. Lots of things, David.

Backing up on optical media? Still using CDs? Backing up photos on optical media? You're living in the past! :lol: Just kidding really Glenn, and you have a point about existing software disks... but it's getting pretty obvious that optical media is going the way of the dodo, and you could save images of your software disks onto a hard drive.

 

PS: I would strongly recommend against backing up anything on optical media, it's unreliable for that purpose. I have had numerous optical media that were completely impossible to read after only a few years. I now use hard drives and/or off site servers exclusively.

 

Anyway my point is most people don't NEED an optical bay any longer, especially newcomers (someone who's never owned a computer before).

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Hmmm. I have audio CD-Rs that I made as far back as 1998 which still work perfectly. The only disks I've ever had problems with were RWs. In any case, I have redundant backups, and Time Machine running. As for CDs, I truly don't understand the trend toward lower-fi formats (as if 16 bit 44.1 khz was hi-fi). Why have a system, as decent as many of us have, only to listen to digitally compressed audio? I also know many people who don't listen to music on their computers or portable devices, who sit in front of a traditional stereo, and actually listen to music. If and when CD-Rs are discontinued, how will any of us, who don't get professional duping done, share our music with them? Anyways, this debate isn't going to be settled in this thread. :mrgreen:

 

You're right though: I am being shoved, kicking and screaming into this Brave New World. :lol:

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Hmmm. I have audio CD-Rs that I made as far back as 1998 which still work perfectly.

Audio CD-Rs are most forgiving than data CD-Rs. I have had data CD-Rs be unreadable after only 5-6 years. That used to be the way I backed up my Logic projects, and I have lost many of them that way. :(

 

As for CDs, I truly don't understand the trend toward lower-fi formats (as if 16 bit 44.1 khz was hi-fi). Why have a system, as decent as many of us have, only to listen to digitally compressed audio? I also know many people who don't listen to music on their computers or portable devices, who sit in front of a traditional stereo, and actually listen to music. If and when CD-Rs are discontinued, how will any of us, who don't get professional duping done, share our music with them? Anyways, this debate isn't going to be settled in this thread. :mrgreen:

It seems to me you're equating CD with 44.1/16 PCM files. But you can have, use and share PCM files, even higher quality ones, without using any CDs or any other optical media. I use FTP servers, portable hard drives, and devices like phones or iPods to store PCM files. You're right though that since the demise of the CD we've seen more and more people listen to AACs or mp3s (or worse, YouTube). It definitely is food for thought when standards go backwards in quality. :shock:

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But they were data CD-Rs used for music, David! And how does the person who doesn't use their computer for music, but, rather, a CD player connected to an amp and speakers, get to hear new music if there is no physical media?

 

LUDDITES OF THE WORLD UNITE! or something...... :lol:

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But they were data CD-Rs used for music, David!

Well then you got luckier than me!!

 

how does the person who doesn't use their computer for music, but, rather, a CD player connected to an amp and speakers, get to hear new music if there is no physical media?

You can play PCM files from your iPod or iPad or phone etc....

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But they were data CD-Rs used for music, David!

Well then you got luckier than me!!

 

how does the person who doesn't use their computer for music, but, rather, a CD player connected to an amp and speakers, get to hear new music if there is no physical media?

You can play PCM files from your iPod or iPad or phone etc....

 

But they don't have these gizmos! Jeez, there's no talking to you, is there? :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

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I have not much use of optical drives anymore.

All my huge install libraries (Kontakt libraries, EW libraries, Spectrasonics... you name it) are on a NAS. It saves me an enormous amount of time when installing and reinstalling.

 

But if we start talking about floppies I'm all ears! ;)

 

A year or two ago I saw a box of floppy disks for sale at the local Radio Shack, on clearance, in a pack of 10 for $4.97. A friend said it best: "$5 for that crap!? outrageous!"

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The new server, from what I've read, comes stock with 5400 RPM HDDs, not 7200, like the 2011s.

 

Yes.. that is such a shame.. The stock 7200 rpm drives that came with the 2011 model were very good... and fast... Glad i picked up a couple of those 'babies'.

 

The new server version... again, I'm a little disappointed to see you cannot have the new fusion drive as an option.. (I could have sworn during the presentation that someone said it would be an option but apparently not.. It's only for the non server versions..) though the 4 USB 3 slots are a nice addition along with the Thunderbolt and the retention (unlike the new iMacs) of FW800 was a surprise.

 

Overall though, I think Apple dropped the specs this year... for the server version... in comparison to the new non server Mac Minis.. Not so much of a gap as there was last year and so not as much of an incentive to buy one this year.

 

*clarification* Not so much incentive to purchase a MMS compared to a standard MM... as there was last year.

 

As an aside, I don't expect it will be long until some 3rd party will provide 7200rpm drives for it.. but that's all extra money.

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The Amazon Basic DVD/CD writer.. (which i picked up for $26 on sale a few months back) is the ideal companion for the Mac Minis (and now the iMacs..). Compared to the Superdrive which i also own.. I have found it to be faster.. more reliable and a heck of a lot cheaper... so I'm not concerned about the lack of built in burners these days. I thought I'd miss it from the 2011 MMS's but that's not the case at all.
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I'm waiting to see the specs of everything on everymac.com (unless you guys can direct me towards a similar site). Several people on this site recommended the 2011 mini server over imac. I'm wondering if this will still be the case. Obviously if it's for Logic I'll be upgrading/maxing the hard drives and ram.
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Mmm :D this Fusion Drive thing looks interesting too... wondering :? if that will put an end to the sine qua non for separate drives, for apps & data files storage needs :?:

No it won't, it's just a hybrid SSD/HD, they existed before, Apple just gave them a fancy name and adapted their behavior using other existing technologies as the linked article explains. They're still a single drive, so for better performance it's still better to save your Logic projects onto a different drive than the drive where you have OS X.

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i just noticed, there's an optical drive in my macbook pro! i thought that was a letter slot...no wonder my landlord isn't getting my rent checks...

 

seriously, especially with a desktop (like the imac, or mini)...easy to add an external. but seems less & less people USE the optical drives on their macs.

 

either way, THIS is how it now is. as always, apple tells us what to do (and then we do it...)

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In a way, I prefer the no internal optical drive. If it craps the bed, then it costs more than it should to replace it. I just hope that externals continue to be supported, and the media stays available.

 

One thing I've wondered about the last couple of years is why Apple wasn't putting in BD-R(W) burners. Now I understand.

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I think Apple's stuff is pretty close to the edge, thermally speaking, these days. There's no room for heatsinking (actually I suppose the case is the heatsink now) which is the reason my MacBook pro burns my leg and by 2005 ibook felt pretty cool to the touch.

 

I think if they put a 7400 in there it would fry in no time. Also, they're cheaper and they figure most people wouldn't be able to tell the difference (and they are right)

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Can somebody explain to me why they're still releasing new products with 5400rpm drives?

They're quieter

They also suck less power and generate less heat.

 

...and usually they are considered more reliable.... though some would argue with that depending on the brand/type of drive!

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Am i the only one that thinks this may mean no more Mac pro? They're obviously marketing it for professional use. I'm thinking this may be apple's "something big" in response to the Mac pro petition. And.... Why so skinny? What is the point? Remember all the overheating problems the older imacs had?
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